Big Bang

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Related to Primeval atom: Georges Lemaitre

Big Bang

n.
The beginning of space, time, matter, energy, and of the expansion of the universe according to the Big Bang theory.

big bang

n
1. any sudden forceful beginning or radical change
2. (Astronomy) (modifier) of or relating to the big-bang theory
3. (Banking & Finance) (sometimes capitals) the major modernization that took place on the London Stock Exchange on Oct 27 1986, after which the distinction between jobbers and brokers was abolished and operations became fully computerized

Big′ Bang′


n.
(sometimes l.c.) the cosmic explosion of matter postulated by the big bang theory.
[1950–55]

big bang

(bĭg)
The violent explosion of an extremely small, hot, and dense body of matter between 12 and 18 billion years ago. It is viewed as the earliest event in a widely held model of the origin of the universe. Compare steady state universe.
Did You Know? It's a chilling thought: In the 1920s, astronomers found that wherever they looked in space, distant galaxies were rapidly moving away from Earth. In other words, the universe was getting larger and larger. By calculating the speed of several galaxies and working back from there, astronomers learned that this expansion began between 12 and 18 billion years ago, when the entire universe was smaller than a dime and almost infinitely dense. According to the widely accepted theory of the big bang, a massive explosion kicked off the expansion and was the origin of space and time. Now scientists must figure out how much mass the universe contains in order to see what lies ahead. If there is enough mass, the gravity attracting all the pieces to each other will eventually stop the expansion and pull all the pieces of the universe back together in a "big crunch." The universe would then be a closed universe. However, there may not be enough mass to support a universe that is closed. If that is the case, then an open universe would expand forever, and all the galaxies and stars would drift away from each other and become dark and cold.

big bang

The day in 1986 when, in the course of one day, the London Stock Exchange was deregulated and new computing technology brought in.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.big bang - (cosmology) the cosmic explosion that is hypothesized to have marked the origin of the universe
cosmogeny, cosmogony, cosmology - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
blowup, detonation, explosion - a violent release of energy caused by a chemical or nuclear reaction
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
He claimed that it was the disintegration of this primeval atom that gave birth to the Universe.
According to a NASA Web site, the Big Bang was first proposed in 1927 by Belgian Catholic priest Georges Lemaitre, who speculated that the universe began with the explosion of a primeval atom.