inertia

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Related to Principle of inertia: Newton's second law

in·er·tia

 (ĭ-nûr′shə)
n.
1. Physics The tendency of a body at rest to remain at rest or of a body in straight line motion to stay in motion in a straight line unless acted on by an outside force; the resistance of a body to changes in momentum.
2. Resistance or disinclination to motion, action, or change: an entrenched bureaucracy's inertia.

[Latin, idleness, from iners, inert-, inert; see inert.]

in·er′tial adj.
in·er′tial·ly adv.

inertia

(ɪnˈɜːʃə; -ʃɪə)
n
1. the state of being inert; disinclination to move or act
2. (General Physics) physics
a. the tendency of a body to preserve its state of rest or uniform motion unless acted upon by an external force
b. an analogous property of other physical quantities that resist change: thermal inertia.
inˈertial adj

in•er•tia

(ɪnˈɜr ʃə, ɪˈnɜr-)

n.
1. inertness, esp. with regard to effort, motion, action, and the like; inactivity; sluggishness.
2.
a. the property of matter by which it retains its state of rest or its velocity along a straight line so long as it is not acted upon by an external force.
b. an analogous property of a force: electric inertia.
[1705–15; < Latin: lack of skill, slothfulness. See inert, -ia]
in•er′tial, adj.

in·er·tia

(ĭ-nûr′shə)
The tendency of a body at rest to remain at rest, or of a body in motion to continue moving in a straight line at a constant speed unless a force is applied to it. Mass is a measure of a body's inertia.

inertia

A body’s tendency to maintain a state of rest or of uniform motion.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inertia - a disposition to remain inactive or inert; "he had to overcome his inertia and get back to work"
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
languor, lethargy, phlegm, sluggishness, flatness - inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy; "the general appearance of sluggishness alarmed his friends"
restfulness - the attribute of being restful; "he longed for the restfulness of home"
passivity, passiveness - the trait of remaining inactive; a lack of initiative
indolence, laziness - inactivity resulting from a dislike of work
2.inertia - (physics) the tendency of a body to maintain its state of rest or uniform motion unless acted upon by an external force
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
moment of inertia - the tendency of a body to resist angular acceleration
mechanical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon associated with the equilibrium or motion of objects

inertia

Translations
فُتور، خُمول، جُمود
ochablostsetrvačnost
inertitræghed
hitausinertia
aîgerîaleysi; sljóleiki
daadloosheidinertietraagheid
bezvládnosť
tröghet
eylemsizliktembellik

inertia

[ɪˈnɜːʃə] N
1. [of person] → inercia f, apatía f
2. (Chem, Phys) → inercia f
see also moment 2

inertia

[ɪnˈɜːrʃə] ninertie finertia-reel seat belt nceinture f de sécurité à enrouleur

inertia

n (lit, fig)Trägheit f; inertia-reel seat beltAutomatikgurt m

inertia

[ɪˈnɜːʃə] ninerzia

inert

(iˈnəːt) adjective
1. without the power to move. A stone is an inert object.
2. (of people) not wanting to move, act or think. lazy, inert people.
iˈnertness noun
iˈnertia (-ʃiə) noun
the state of being inert. It was difficult to overcome the feeling of inertia that the wine and heat had brought on.

in·er·ti·a

n. inercia, falta de actividad; letargia, abulia, resistencia a un cambio.
References in periodicals archive ?
Koyre took the example of the principle of inertia to understand the damping of the movement of bodies that we observe in the empirical world.
NEWTON'S FIRST LAW OF MOTION, also known as the principle of inertia, says "Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.
On "Fumes," he offers a refresher on the principle of inertia without using that word, then samples a science recording to reinforce the metaphor in the song.
Palmerino's study of Pierre Gassendi's correspondence challenges his proto-Newtonian image: his principle of inertia still had circular elements, and his notion of force did not yield a uniform continuous acceleration even as he sought the cause behind Galileo's odd-numbers law of free fall.

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