Professionalist


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Pro`fes´sion`al`ist


n.1.professional person.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ms Ghazala Baig, exhibition organizer told that eight campuses of Karachi Public School took part in exhibition and Jauhar campus is winner in Science projects adding that Science Exhibition is with live demonstration and its Technics through projects and models visitors may get involved in the wonders of science experiments, exhibition was being judged by renowned educationist , professionalist and related to science fields.
Reader Matthew Cropp wondered if "this is symptomatic of the logical end-point of the merger and consolidation trend that has been afoot since the professionalist faction won the share insurance fight in 1970.
It draws on central professionalist features such as objectivity and neutrality, but as these features do not fit into the evaluative characteristics of cultural journalism, its position within cultural journalism is partly problematic.
4) The significance of this narrative for our purposes here, however, is that we can easily recognize a tension in "The Intentional Fallacy" between the canonical status of the high literary authors they discuss--the implicit value conferred upon their works by a critical methodology that seeks to understand and unveil the "public" ideas and values these works communicate--and an emergent professionalist critical discourse that views such universalizing tendencies with increasing suspicion.
As in the case of other Latin American countries (Levy, 1986), this allows us to characterize Argentine higher education as professionalist.
Havighurst, An Apology for Professionalist Regimes, 28 J.
A few state awards have been granted: Ohio Professionalist Award--Shirley Laidley, AHI, and President's Award Lynette Thomson, MT.
Guillory's powerful interpretation of "theory" as a reiteration of the bureaucratic conditions of its production requires, as I have argued elsewhere ("Professing Literature"), this crucial caveat: "theory," in its most self-conscious and symptomatic form as de Manian rhetorical reading (and, let me add in this context, Derridean deconstruction), brings to legibility the complex, vexed intimacy between aesthetics and mechanical reproducibility, and between aesthetic and professionalist ideology.
I plead "yes" every time to the professionalist accusation: "You are an amateur, unqualified.