profoundly deaf

(redirected from Profound hearing loss)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

profoundly deaf

adj
(Pathology) unable to hear any sound below 95 decibels in one's better ear
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.profoundly deaf - totally deafprofoundly deaf - totally deaf; unable to hear anything
deaf - lacking or deprived of the sense of hearing wholly or in part
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, in April 2015, Bernafon launched Supremia, a Super Power BTE hearing aid for adults and children with severe and profound hearing loss.
This contract relates to a framework agreement on the hearing aids for people with severe to profound hearing loss, including accessories and spare parts for the successive call-off as described in the Specification and template contracts.
Umar Farooq said Cochlear Implant is recommended for the children with profound hearing loss in both ears and who have shown little prior success with hearing aids.
The hair cells either die off or are damaged, resulting in moderate to profound hearing loss.
11 The existing MDR-TB hearing loss percentages translate to about 4 000 people on the verge of mild to profound hearing loss as a result of side-effects of the toxic but lifesaving kanamycin, a drug used in the MDRTB treatment cocktail.
Worldwide, the UN health agency says 360 million people today have moderate to profound hearing loss due to various causes, such as noise, genetic conditions, complications at birth, certain infectious diseases, chronic ear infections, the use of particular drugs, and ageing.
Additionally, infants with profound hearing loss who received cochlear implants to help correct their hearing soon reached the vocalization levels of their hearing peers, putting them on track for language development.
Building Bridges Crossing Borders tells of Kyler Daniels, born in 1988 with profound hearing loss.
These hearing aids are used for the treatment of profound hearing loss and are a device of preference when it pertains to the treatment of hearing loss in children.
Other health benefits announced before the budget include an extra $22 million for non government organisation budgeting services; new funding for rural and Maori housing; a further $20 million for rheumatic fever screening and awareness; and funding for two cochlear implants, rather than one, for children with profound hearing loss.