Prometheus

(redirected from Prometheus (Greek mythology))
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Pro·me·the·us

 (prə-mē′thē-əs, -thyo͞os′)
n. Greek Mythology
A Titan who stole fire from Olympus and gave it to humankind, for which Zeus chained him to a rock and sent an eagle to eat his liver, which grew back daily.

[Latin Promētheus, from Greek.]

Prometheus

(prəˈmiːθɪəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a Titan, who stole fire from Olympus to give to mankind and in punishment was chained to a rock, where an eagle tore at his liver until Hercules freed him

Pro•me•the•us

(prəˈmi θi əs, -θyus)

n.
a Titan in Greek myth who stole fire from Olympus and gave it to humankind in defiance of Zeus: in revenge, Zeus chained Prometheus to a rock where an eagle tore at his liver until he was finally released by Hercules.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Prometheus - (Greek mythology) the Titan who stole fire from Olympus and gave it to mankindPrometheus - (Greek mythology) the Titan who stole fire from Olympus and gave it to mankind; Zeus punished him by chaining him to a rock where an eagle gnawed at his liver until Hercules rescued him
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations
Prometeus
Prometeu

Prometheus

[prəˈmiːθjuːs] NPrometeo

Prometheus

nPrometheus m

Prometheus

[prəˈmiːθɪəs] nPrometeo