propeller

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Related to Propeller engine: propeller thrust

pro·pel·ler

also pro·pel·lor  (prə-pĕl′ər)
n.
A device for propelling an aircraft or boat, consisting of a spinning shaft with radiating angled blades that thrust air or water in the direction opposite the desired direction of travel.

propeller

(prəˈpɛlə)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) a device having blades radiating from a central hub that is rotated to produce thrust to propel a ship, aircraft, etc
2. a person or thing that propels

pro•pel•ler

(prəˈpɛl ər)

n.
1. a device having a revolving hub with radiating blades, for propelling an airplane, ship, etc.
2. a person or thing that propels.
3. the bladed rotor of a pump that drives the fluid axially.
4. a wind-driven, usu. three-bladed device that provides mechanical energy, as for driving an electric alternator in wind plants.
[1770–80]

pro·pel·ler

(prə-pĕl′ər)
A device consisting of a series of twisted blades mounted around a shaft and spun to force air or water in a specific direction and thereby move an aircraft or boat.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.propeller - a mechanical device that rotates to push against air or waterpropeller - a mechanical device that rotates to push against air or water
airplane propeller, airscrew, prop - a propeller that rotates to push against air
vane, blade - flat surface that rotates and pushes against air or water
hub - the central part of a car wheel (or fan or propeller etc) through which the shaft or axle passes
mechanical device - mechanism consisting of a device that works on mechanical principles
screw propeller, screw - a propeller with several angled blades that rotates to push against water or air
variable-pitch propeller - propeller for which the angle of the blades is adjustable

propeller

noun prop (informal), rotor, vane an aircraft with a fixed three-blade propeller
Translations
دافِع، جِهاز دَفْع، مِرْوَحَه
lodní šroubvrtule
propelskrue
potkuripropelli
propeller
skrúfa
lodná skrutkavrtuľa
vijak

propeller

[prəˈpeləʳ]
A. Nhélice f
B. CPD propeller shaft N (Aer) → árbol m de la hélice (Aut) → árbol m or eje m de transmisión (Naut) → eje m portahélice

propeller

[prəˈpɛlər] n [boat, plane] → hélice fpropeller shaft prop shaft narbre m de transmissionpropelling pencil n (British)porte-mine m inv

propeller

nPropeller m; propeller blade (Aviat) → Luftschrauben-/Propellerblatt nt; (Naut) → Schraubenflügel m; propeller shaftAntriebswelle f; (Aut) → Kardanwelle f; (Naut) → Schraubenwelle f

propeller

[prəˈpɛləʳ] nelica

propel

(prəˈpel) past tense, past participle proˈpelled verb
to drive forward, especially mechanically. The boat is propelled by a diesel engine.
proˈpeller noun
a device, consisting of revolving blades, used to drive a ship or an aircraft.
proˈpulsion (-ˈpalʃən) noun
the process of propelling or being propelled. jet-propulsion.
proˌpelling-ˈpencil noun
a pencil consisting of a metal or plastic case containing a lead that is pushed forward by a screwing mechanism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Flying by paramotor, which involves being strapped to a small propeller engine and a parachute wing, is the best way to travel, as Ms Dench will be able to land and take off on foot on the remote and vast tundra - populated by polar bears - where no wheeled vehicle could.
The Coast Guard has been allowed to acquire propeller engine for offshore patrol vessel.
The 'Hot Tub,' is powered by a steam wood-burning stove to heat the water and a propeller engine to keep you sailing merrily down the stream.
As his cousin gives a thumbs up Rafeek with the two-stroke man pack propeller engine purring on his back and the canopy, flew towards the mountain.
TV presenter Grylls was preparing in the UK for last year's successful record breaking attempt to fly a paramotor - a flimsy chute powered by a backpack propeller engine - over the height of Mount Everest when disaster struck.
But you had huge technical innovation then, especially during the '50s, when the propeller engine was replace by the jet engine, and nothing of comparable magnitude later.
is a longtime engine manufacturer and one of America's major propeller engine producers for small planes.
Once in flight, the plane will have only two 25 Kw hydrogen fuel cells to drive the propeller engine, with the only by-products from the engines being water and heat.
The second unit is a propeller engine testing (Propeller test cell) formed around the turboprop engine testing, including propellers with power of 2000 kW for research purposes.
In some cases the places where these birds breed and where they return every spring, and the precise r h r ht w birds using just a parachute wing and a small propeller engine.