propositional attitude


Also found in: Wikipedia.

propositional attitude

n
(Philosophy) logic philosophy a relation between a person and a proposition, such as belief, desire, intention, etc
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Braddon-Mitchell & Jackson 2007) consider that a propositional attitude is episodic when one is conscious of it happening and exerting causal influence over one's own actions.
Holism refers to the fact no single propositional attitude, such as a desire to go to the park, ever directly causes a behavior.
Only premise 2 and the conclusion involve the propositional attitude "rejects"; premise 1 is an unembedded (propositional-attitude-free) proposition.
Additionally, mothers' propositional attitude and personal history of teasing may directly affect their perceptions of (and interventions regarding) their own children's teasing.
Virtues are states of character, and friendship is a relation that holds between persons; neither is a propositional attitude, so neither is similar enough to pain to count as its opposite.
But no actual psychological theory has ever pretended to provide a set of laws which distinguish, say, the state of being jealous of Desdemona's supposed love for Cassio from every other actual or possible propositional attitude.
For example, some propositional attitude predicates, such as hegeisthai 'believe', or oisthai 'believe', take infinitive complements (example [5] above).
If they encountered a propositional attitude that was like a belief in all respects except that it was not true, however, they would face the same choices as we faced in the case of the pink "daisies.
The same could be said of the propositional attitude of "belief" and the elusive concept of "validity.
First, it may be used as a propositional attitude predicate of the truth claim type, and mean something similar to realize or understand.
The notion of a propositional attitude makes pleasure an inherently reflective phenomenon.
presents intentional action descriptions (expressing a "conative [volitional] propositional attitude about actions in one's best interests") as a prelude to a reconstruction of Kantian hypothetical imperatives of prudence, concluding with moral implications in light of a formal, semantical.