proton

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pro·ton

 (prō′tŏn′)
n. Abbr. p
The stable, positively charged nucleon, having a mass 1,836 times that of an electron and being a baryon composed of two up quarks and one down quark. The proton is a basic component of all atomic nuclei and the nucleus of the protium isotope of hydrogen.

[From Greek prōton, neuter of prōtos, first; see per in Indo-European roots.]

pro·ton′ic adj.

proton

(ˈprəʊtɒn)
n
(General Physics) a stable, positively charged elementary particle, found in atomic nuclei in numbers equal to the atomic number of the element. It is a baryon with a charge of 1.602176462 × 10–19 coulomb, a rest mass of 1.672 62159 × 10–27 kilogram, and spin
[C20: from Greek prōtos first]

pro•ton

(ˈproʊ tɒn)

n.
a positively charged elementary particle found in all atomic nuclei, the lightest and most stable of the baryons, and having a positive charge of 1.602 x 1019 coulombs: the number of protons in an atom equals that element's atomic number.
[1915–20; n. use of Greek prôton, neuter of prôtos first]
pro•ton′ic, adj.

pro·ton

(prō′tŏn′)
A stable subatomic particle that has a positive electric charge and is part of the nucleus of an atom. Its charge is opposite to that of an electron but is equal in magnitude. A proton's mass is 1,836 times that of an electron. See more at atom.

proton

1. One of the three basic particles in the atom, found in the nucleus with the neutron. It has positive charge.
2. A positively charged subatomic particle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proton - a stable particle with positive charge equal to the negative charge of an electronproton - a stable particle with positive charge equal to the negative charge of an electron
hydrogen ion - a positively charged atom of hydrogen; that is to say, a normal hydrogen atomic nucleus
nucleon - a constituent (proton or neutron) of an atomic nucleus
Translations
proton
proton
protoni
proton
proton
proton
róteind
protonas
protons
protón
proton
proton
proton

proton

[ˈprəʊtɒn] Nprotón m

proton

[ˈprəʊtɒn] nproton m

proton

nProton nt

proton

[ˈprəʊtɒn] nprotone m

proton

(ˈprəuton) noun
a particle with a positive electrical charge, forming part of the nucleus of an atom.

pro·ton

n. protón, partícula en el núcleo de un átomo cuya carga positiva y masa es 1836 veces la de un neutrón. La terapia especializada con uso de partículas de protón se usa en tratamientos de cáncer de la próstata, del cerebro y del cáncer de la mama.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are also other positive aspects in this scenario such as that of the Loma Linda facility which has been using protons to treat men with prostate cancer since 1991 and found that major rectal and urinary side effects occur among less than 1% of its patients.
Protons have a low LET, so scientists expected them to behave as X rays do in their DNA-damaging capability, notes Sutherland.
A setup was determined which should make it possible to confine UCN with negligible losses and detect the protons emerging from [beta]-decay with high efficiency: stacked superconducting solenoids create the magnetic storage field, an electrostatic extraction field inside the storage volume assures high proton collection efficiency.
Proton therapy uses high-speed protons to fight cancer by aiming a high-energy ionizing beam at the tumor, destroying its cells.
238(11) [13] from a measurement of electrons and protons in coincidence, which is the first determination to date.
The eruptions themselves weren't record breakers, but one was accompanied by a storm of high-energy protons that was the most energetic proton squall that's been recorded near Earth in 15 years.
We are very excited to be able to bring the power of protons to patients," said William Hartsell, M.
Founded in 2008 by Susan Ralston, the mission of the organization is to provide education, advocacy and assistance to families in need of pediatric protons.
The protons, which come from this region will be accelerated and registered by a proton detector.
The fusion occurs at a leisurely rate, but when little hydrogen is left, the star activates an alternative helium-making process, which is based on collisions between protons and nuclei of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen.
The facility offers before-the-job training that simulates all aspects of proton therapy treatment in a replica of a proton therapy treatment center featuring everything but the actual protons.