protreptic


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protreptic

(prəʊˈtrɛptɪk)
n
(Rhetoric) an educational book or speech
adj
(Rhetoric) didactic
References in periodicals archive ?
9) Consider a few examples of Socrates' characteristically protreptic conversational style.
Bonaventure's Collationes in Hexaemeron: Fractured Sermons and Protreptic Discourse," Franciscan Studies 63 (2005) 107-29.
35) The dialogue pursues this goal by considering how the order of disciplines (ordo disciplinarum) can serve as a protreptic path to learning the rational order of creation (ordo rerum).
A perfect illustration of this protreptic imagery is found in Epode 7.
The topics include Augustine between Manichaean and Catholic Christianity, understanding a universal religion with exclusivist practices, the few and the many as a motif of Augustine's controversy with the Manichaeans, a protreptic to a liminal Manichaean at the center of Augustine's Confessions, and Manichaean self-designations in the Western tradition.
But, at the same time, mathematics was just a necessary propaedeutic and protreptic to the most advanced form of investigation, analysis and synthesis, the pursuit of what Plato calls dialektike (dialectic).
See Socrates' account of his own protreptic task as a philosopher in Ap.
Arguably, then, while the metaphysical superimposition of a pyramidal 'spatialized structure' was the Classical Greek medium, it was not its intention to incentivize xenophobic hatred of the Other: as a cognitive emotion, hatred would have categorically exploded the protreptic (Socratic, moral) underpinning of philosophy as an extended, forward-looking process of rational inquiry--one driven by a special sense of Eros.
Hutchinson & Monte Ransome Johnson, Aristotle's Protrepficus: A Provisional Reconstruction, PROTREPTIC, https://sites.
It is certain that at the dawn of Islam the meaning and the function of the maqam were close to the European exemplum : it signified the protreptic usually given by an ascetic (zahid) in the caliph's or a high official's presence.
Just as the 'invisible hand of Jupiter" was part of the vocabulary of ancient 'superstition," the 'invisible hand' is part of Smith's philosophical and protreptic rhetoric whose purpose is likewise to establish order persuasively.
For the legislature it is protreptic (adopt a policy) or apotropaic (reject a policy).