Prussianism


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Prussianism

(ˈprʌʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the ethos of the Prussian state and aristocracy, esp militarism and stern discipline
2. (Historical Terms) the ethos of the Prussian state and aristocracy, esp militarism and stern discipline

Prus•sian•ism

(ˈprʌʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n.
the militaristic spirit, system, policy, or methods historically associated with the Prussians.
[1855–60]

Prussianism

the theories, actions, and principles of the Prussians. — Prussian, n., adj.
See also: Government
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Patriotism rots into Prussianism when you pretend it is the first virtue.
Zionism: Democracy or Prussianism," a New Republic article published in 1919, expanded this claim by contending that the national philosophy of Zionism is "an extension of the assumptions of liberalism from the individual to the group.
He proceeded to argue that it would not be huge unions, destructive strikes, Prussianism and Bolshevism, or even conciliation boards, but instead a fundamental change to the existing wage system that would solve social unrest,(120) According to Dougall, this meant a new system that would follow a producer cooperative where the working farmer borrows money from the capitalist to stock and improve his farm, pays the capitalist a fixed rate of interest, and retains the profits for himself.
Thus, going back to Edwardian times, he along with many other Englishmen, saw Prussianism and the hubristic attitudes of Germany as a potential threat to Europe and to world peace.
131) But in general, in the Prussian areas, Liberal activities expressed conservative values such as loyalty to the State and Kaiser, belief in a state of law and authority (Recht und Obrigkeit Staat) and support of Prussianism.
I think, but am not sure, because Foerster represented right-wing reaction and Prussianism.
In this capacity, he had penned numerous anti-German pamphlets, including a memorable work entitled The Peril of Prussianism (1917)(see also Johnson 1917a; 1918; 1921).