Prussia

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Prus·sia

 (prŭsh′ə)
A historical region of north-central Europe including present-day northern Germany and Poland. Its ancient, Baltic-speaking inhabitants were conquered by the Teutonic Knights in the 1200s. West Prussia was ceded to Poland in 1466, and East Prussia became a Polish fief that passed to Brandenburg in 1618. Proclaimed a kingdom in 1701, Prussia became a military power under Frederick II (reigned 1740-1786). Prussia was instrumental in the unification of Germany, and in 1871 its king was declared Kaiser Wilhelm I of Germany.

Prussia

(ˈprʌʃə)
n
(Placename) a former German state in N and central Germany, extending from France and the Low Countries to the Baltic Sea and Poland: developed as the chief military power of the Continent, leading the North German Confederation from 1867–71, when the German Empire was established; dissolved in 1947 and divided between East and West Germany, Poland, and the former Soviet Union. Area: (in 1939) 294 081 sq km (113 545 sq miles). German name: Preussen

Prus•sia

(ˈprʌʃ ə)

n.
a former state in N Europe: became a military power in the 18th century and in 1871 led the formation of the German empire; formally abolished as an administrative unit in 1947. German, Preussen. Compare East Prussia, West Prussia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Prussia - a former kingdom in north-central Europe including present-day northern Germany and northern PolandPrussia - a former kingdom in north-central Europe including present-day northern Germany and northern Poland; "in the 19th century Prussia led the economic and political unification of the German states"
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
Brandenburg - the territory of an Elector (of the Holy Roman Empire) that expanded to become the kingdom of Prussia in 1701
Poland, Polska, Republic of Poland - a republic in central Europe; the invasion of Poland by Germany in 1939 started World War II
Prussian - a German inhabitant of Prussia
Translations
PreußenPrußen

Prussia

[ˈprʌʃə] NPrusia f

Prussia

nPreußen nt

Prussia

[ˈprʌʃə] nPrussia
References in classic literature ?
By 'n' by war-times come, when the Prussians fight us.
A miscellaneous assortment they were, differing both in caste and country; as I sat on my estrade and glanced over the long range of desks, I had under my eye French, English, Belgians, Austrians, and Prussians.
But one mark of a writer's greatness is that different minds can find in him different inspirations; and Professor Erlin, who hated the Prussians, gave his enthusiastic admiration to Goethe because his works, Olympian and sedate, offered the only refuge for a sane mind against the onslaughts of the present generation.
In point of grazing, plunging, oblique, or enfilading, or point-blank firing, the English, French, and Prussians have nothing to learn; but their cannon, howitzers, and mortars are mere pocket-pistols compared with the formidable engines of the American artillery.
these same Prussians who are so arrogant to-day, were three to one against you at Jena, and six to one at Montmirail.
They could exchange their views concerning the Duke of Wellington, whose conduct in the Catholic Question had thrown such an entirely new light on his character; and speak slightingly of his conduct at the battle of Waterloo, which he would never have won if there hadn't been a great many Englishmen at his back, not to speak of Blucher and the Prussians, who, as Mr.
When the dueling was finished and we were ready to go, the gentlemen of the Prussian Corps to whom we had been introduced took off their caps in the courteous German way, and also shook hands; their brethren of the same order took off their caps and bowed, but without shaking hands; the gentlemen of the other corps treated us just as they would have treated white caps--they fell apart, apparently unconsciously, and left us an unobstructed pathway, but did not seem to see us or know we were there.
The fight of the German, and especially, of the Prussian bourgeoisie, against feudal aristocracy and absolute monarchy, in other words, the liberal movement, became more earnest.
Just look at her husband--that tall, wizened Prussian there, with the stick in his hand.
The selling of newspapers had its birth in Constantinople about a year ago, and was a child of the Prussian and Austrian war.
There were no porters within reach of Hauptmann Schneider so he vented his Prussian spleen upon the askaris nearest at hand, yet with greater circumspection since these men bore loaded rifles--and the three white men were alone with them in the heart of Africa.
I shall never forget the hideous expression upon the face of the great Prussian with whom chance confronted me.