Przewalski's horse


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Prze·wal·ski's horse

 (shə-väl′skēz)
n.
A wild horse (Equus ferus subsp. przewalskii) of central Asia, having a light brown coat with a short erect mane and no forelock. It became extinct in the wild but has been reintroduced in Mongolia from captive populations. Also called takhi.

[After Nikolai Mikhaylovich Przhevalsky (1839-1888), Russian explorer who was the first European to describe it.]

Przewalski's horse

(ˌpɜːʒəˈvælskɪz)
n
(Animals) a wild horse, Equus przewalskii, of W Mongolia, having an erect mane and no forelock: extinct in the wild, only a few survive in captivity
[C19: named after the Russian explorer Nikolai Mikhailovich Przewalski (1839–88), who discovered it]

Prze•wal′ski's horse′

(pʃəˈvɑl skiz, ʃə-)
n.
a wild horse, Equus caballus przevalskii, chiefly of Mongolia and Xinjiang, having a light yellow coat and a short, stiff black mane.
[after Nikolaĭ Mikhaĭlovich Przheval'skiĭ (Polish Przewalski) (1839–88), Russian explorer, the animal's first European observer (1876)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Przewalski's horse - wild horse of central Asia that resembles an assPrzewalski's horse - wild horse of central Asia that resembles an ass; now endangered
wild horse - undomesticated or feral domestic horse
References in periodicals archive ?
The research analyzed the family tree of a type of horse called a Przewalski's horse that has long been thought to be the only remaining wild horse group in the world, Nat Geo reported.
The results of the analysis show that Przewalski's horse, rescued from extinction in the 20th century classified as an endangered species, is a descendant of horses, domesticated about 5500 years ago by representatives of the Botai culture in Kazakhstan.
Two of Central Asia's rarest species, Przewalski's Horse and the Gobi Bear, should be protected with stricter conservation measures, experts said ahead of an international conference in Manila.
Horse domestication and conservation genetics of Przewalski's horse inferred from sex chromosomal and autosomal sequences.
Similar results were also found for Przewalski's horse living in a similar environment (Zheng et al.
2006: Capture and anesthesia of wild Mongolian equids--the Przewalski's horse (E.
By lining up the DNA from the ancient and modern horses, the researchers concluded that Przewalski's horse is a separate, truly wild species that split sometime between 38,000 and 72,000 years ago from the lineage that led to domestic horses.
Among other insights, the sequence supports the often-debated view that the Przewalski's horse, native to the Mongolian steppes, is the last living population of truly wild horses in the world.
The analysis also found new evidence that an endangered animal called the Przewalski's horse, found in Mongolia and China, is the last surviving wild horse.
In Mongolia, it features Hustain Nuruu National Park, home to Przewalski's horse, the world's last remaining species of wild equine; exploring the habitat for Bactrian camels, Agali mountain sheep, goitered gazelle and Saker Falcons; the dunes known as the "Singing Sands," which emit a remarkable low-pitched groan when the surface is disturbed by the wind; a visit with a camel-herding family to take in the scenery on the back of a Bactrian camel; the Flaming Cliffs, rich with fossils and site of the 1923 discovery of the first nest of dinosaur eggs the world had ever seen; and the Gobi Desert at the Three Camel Lodge, named one of the "Top 50 Ecolodges" by National Geographic Adventure.
The Przewalski's Horse, a type of wild horse from Central Asia, has come back from extinction after a successful breeding program in captivity.
It highlighted 64 mammal, bird and amphibian species that have improved in status, including three species that were extinct in the wild and have been re-introduced: the California Condor, the black-footed ferret in the United States and Przewalski's horse in Mongolia.