Przewalski's horse

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Prze·wal·ski's horse

 (shə-väl′skēz)
n.
A wild horse (Equus ferus subsp. przewalskii) of central Asia, having a light brown coat with a short erect mane and no forelock. It became extinct in the wild but has been reintroduced in Mongolia from captive populations. Also called takhi.

[After Nikolai Mikhaylovich Przhevalsky (1839-1888), Russian explorer who was the first European to describe it.]

Przewalski's horse

(ˌpɜːʒəˈvælskɪz)
n
(Animals) a wild horse, Equus przewalskii, of W Mongolia, having an erect mane and no forelock: extinct in the wild, only a few survive in captivity
[C19: named after the Russian explorer Nikolai Mikhailovich Przewalski (1839–88), who discovered it]

Prze•wal′ski's horse′

(pʃəˈvɑl skiz, ʃə-)
n.
a wild horse, Equus caballus przevalskii, chiefly of Mongolia and Xinjiang, having a light yellow coat and a short, stiff black mane.
[after Nikolaĭ Mikhaĭlovich Przheval'skiĭ (Polish Przewalski) (1839–88), Russian explorer, the animal's first European observer (1876)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Przewalski's horse - wild horse of central Asia that resembles an assPrzewalski's horse - wild horse of central Asia that resembles an ass; now endangered
wild horse - undomesticated or feral domestic horse
References in periodicals archive ?
A massively parallel sequencing approach uncovers ancient origins and high genetic variability of endangered Przewalski's horses.
Named for the Russian colonel who led an expedition in 1881 that found them, Przewalski's horses were extinct in the wild for decades until a captive breeding program reintroduced them to Mongolia in the mid-1990s.
After a successful reintroduction, 306 Przewalski's horses now live in Mongolia.
Urumqi (China), May 22 (Xinhua-ANI): Four endangered Przewalski's horses were sent to Mongolia from west China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region on Monday, marking the first time for China to send the horses to another country since reintroducing the species 17 years ago, according to Cao Jie, director of the Xinjiang Wild Horse Propagation Center.
Characterized by thick necks, large heads and stocky barrels, Przewalski's horses weigh between 250-350 kilograms, are about 1.
Furthermore, considering the problems encountered even by modern collectors trying to breed Przewalski's horses, it seems likely that horse-keeping would have had to have been relatively advanced before controlled breeding, and consequently domestication would have been possible.
Primitive Przewalski's horses are already being used to control woodland vegetation at Clocaenog Forest, while wild boar are being employed in private woods around Beddgelert.
Naturally, they have come to be called Przewalski's horses.
Now, there are enough Przewalski's horses to reintroduce herds into their native habitats.