psoralen

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Related to Psoralens: ichthyosis

pso·ra·len

 (sôr′ə-lən)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds found in certain plants, used to treat psoriasis and vitiligo.

[From New Latin Psōralea, plant genus, from Greek psōralea, neuter pl. of psōraleos, mangy (from the appearance of the plants' leaves), from psōrā, itch.]

psoralen

(ˈsɔːrəˌlɛn)
n
(Pharmacology) any of various naturally occurring photoreactive chemicals, found in some plants, some of which are used in the treatment of skin disorders such as psoriasis and vitiligo.
Translations

psoralen

n psoraleno; — plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) psoraleno más luz ultravioleta A
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References in periodicals archive ?
Other compounds that were reported to be photo-toxic are selected essential oils, psoralens, sulfamides, coal tar derivatives and fluoroquinolones, as well as particular sunscreens such p-aminobenzoic acid, cinnamates and benzophenones.
European companies stopped using psoralens as "tanning activators" in 1996, after studies reported that people who used psoralen-containing sunscreens had a higher risk of melanoma.
Psoralens interact with ultraviolet light to stimulate the proliferation of melanoma cells.
Phototherapy combined with taking psoralens is also effective.
Avoid the rare medications that may be associated with cataract progression, including psoralens, a drug used along with light therapy to treat skin disorders; chlorpromazine, an antipsychotic; and some glaucoma medications.
Using limes and synthetic psoralens to enhance solar disinfection of water (SODIS): a laboratory evaluation with norovirus, Escherichia coli, and M52.
Twenty-one healthy volunteers [either untreated or treated with oral psoralens (8-MOP or 5-MOP)] were enrolled in this study and exposed to solar radiation for evaluation of the following clinical parameters: immediate pigment darkening (IPD), minimal erythema dose (MED), minimal melanogenic dose (MMD), and minimal phototoxic dose (MPD) before and after topical or oral administration of PL.
The ancient Egyptians used a combination of plant extracts and natural sunlight to treat skin disease and a modified form of this therapy is still in use today in the form of psoralens and ultraviolet A (known as PUVA).
Photosensitizing drugs include psoralens (used to treat psoriasis), tetracycline, doxycycline, allopurinol, and phenothiazine (1).
Drug-induced phototoxicities can be caused by psoralens, porphyrins, antibiotics, and NSAIDs.
In a bag of platelets or plasma, the psoralens break down after a day, and an absorbent resin wafer in the bag removes the byproducts.