psoralen

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Related to Psoralens: ichthyosis

pso·ra·len

 (sôr′ə-lən)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds found in certain plants, used to treat psoriasis and vitiligo.

[From New Latin Psōralea, plant genus, from Greek psōralea, neuter pl. of psōraleos, mangy (from the appearance of the plants' leaves), from psōrā, itch.]

psoralen

(ˈsɔːrəˌlɛn)
n
(Pharmacology) any of various naturally occurring photoreactive chemicals, found in some plants, some of which are used in the treatment of skin disorders such as psoriasis and vitiligo.
Translations

psoralen

n psoraleno; — plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) psoraleno más luz ultravioleta A
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References in periodicals archive ?
A range of novel PRTs for blood products that involve the combined use of ultraviolet light and reagents such as psoralens or riboflavin are available (35,36).
Thereby, psoralen makes the skin more sensitive to UV light where psoralens intercalate within DNA.
Ondonsetron , Phenobarbitione, Rabies vaccine, Tetanus Immunoglobulin, Tramadol, Vancomycin, 5- methoxy psoralens, Amlodepine , Atorvastatin, etc.
1,2) It is a nonimmune reaction caused by exposure to chemicals called furocoumarins and psoralens, found in a variety of plants and fruits such as lemons, limes, celery, parsnips, figs, carrots, dill, mustard, and rindweed.
Psoralens are naturally occurring compounds that are activated to triplet states by UVA to produce therapeutic effects in various cutaneous disorders.
The most frequently cited drugs that cause photo-onycholysis are tetracyclines, psoralens, and fluoroquinolones.
Other compounds that were reported to be photo-toxic are selected essential oils, psoralens, sulfamides, coal tar derivatives and fluoroquinolones, as well as particular sunscreens such p-aminobenzoic acid, cinnamates and benzophenones.
3 Conservative therapies include photochemotherapy with psoralens and ultraviolet A (PUVA), phototherapy alone with ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation (broadband UVB 290-320 nm, narrowband UVB (NBUVB) 311 nm), topical and systemic steroids and pseudocatalase.
European companies stopped using psoralens as "tanning activators" in 1996, after studies reported that people who used psoralen-containing sunscreens had a higher risk of melanoma.
Our findings are consistent with evidence from animal experiments, which revealed a potential synergistic effect between psoralens and UV radiation, [but] further investigation is needed to confirm our findings and guide sun exposure behaviors among individuals with high citrus consumption.
Psoralens interact with ultraviolet light to stimulate the proliferation of melanoma cells.
Phototherapy combined with taking psoralens is also effective.