psychedelic

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Related to Psychedelics: DMT

psy·che·del·ic

 (sī′kĭ-dĕl′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, characterized by, or generating hallucinations, distortions of perception, altered states of awareness, and occasionally states resembling psychosis.
2. Suggestive or evocative of an altered or hallucinatory state of perception: psychedelic patterns; psychedelic music.
n.
A drug, such as LSD or mescaline, that produces psychedelic effects.

[psyche + Greek dēloun, to make visible (from dēlos, clear, visible; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots) + -ic.]

psy′che·del′i·cal·ly adv.

psychedelic

(ˌsaɪkɪˈdɛlɪk) or

psychodelic

adj
1. (Recreational Drugs) relating to or denoting new or altered perceptions or sensory experiences, as through the use of hallucinogenic drugs
2. (Recreational Drugs) denoting any of the drugs, esp LSD, that produce these effects
3. (Art Terms) informal (of painting, fabric design, etc) having the vivid colours and complex patterns popularly associated with the visual effects of psychedelic states
[C20: from psyche + Greek delos visible]
ˌpsycheˈdelically, ˌpsychoˈdelically adv

psy•che•del•ic

(ˌsaɪ kɪˈdɛl ɪk)

adj.
1. of or noting a mental state of intensified sensory perception.
2. of or pertaining to any of various drugs that produce this state.
3. resembling, characteristic of, or reproducing images, sounds, or the like, experienced while in such a state: psychedelic painting.
n.
4. a psychedelic drug.
5. a person who uses such a substance.
[1956; psyche + Greek dêl(os) visible, manifest, evident + -ic]
psy`che•del′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.psychedelic - producing distorted sensory perceptions and feelings or altered states of awareness or sometimes states resembling psychosis; "psychedelic drugs like psilocybin and mescaline"
psychoactive, psychotropic - affecting the mind or mood or other mental processes; "psychoactive drugs"
2.psychedelic - having the vivid colors and bizarre patterns associated with psychedelic states; "a psychedelic painting"
colorful, colourful - having striking color; "colorful autumn leaves"
3.psychedelic - (of a mental state) characterized by intense and distorted perceptions and hallucinations and feelings of euphoria or sometimes despair; "a psychedelic experience"
agitated - troubled emotionally and usually deeply; "agitated parents"

psychedelic

adjective
1. hallucinogenic, mind-blowing (informal), psychoactive, hallucinatory, mind-bending (informal), psychotropic, mind-expanding, consciousness-expanding, psychotomimetic experimenting with psychedelic drugs
2. multicoloured, wild, crazy, freaky (slang), kaleidoscopic psychedelic patterns
Translations
psykedeelinen
hallucinogénpszichedelikus
psicadélico
psihedelic

psychedelic

[ˌsaɪkəˈdelɪk] ADJpsicodélico

psychedelic

[ˌsaɪkəˈdɛlɪk] adj
[drug] → psychédélique
(= colourful) → psychédélique
[music] → psychédélique

psychedelic

adjpsychedelisch; drugs alsobewusstseinserweiternd

psychedelic

[ˌsaɪkɪˈdɛlɪk] adjpsichedelico/a

psy·che·del·ic

a. psicodélico-a, rel. a substancias o drogas que pueden inducir alteraciones perceptuales tales como alucinaciones y delirios.
References in periodicals archive ?
Psychedelics benefited from an elite pedigree, thanks to the writer Aldous Huxley and the personal enthusiasm of Time/Life publisher Henry Luce.
By informing current misconceptions about psychedelics, A New Understanding utilizes a collection of accomplished minds to discuss psilocybins' role in culture, evolution, mystical states, and even life itself.
RESEARCH INTO PSYCHEDELICS is undergoing a profound scientific and cultural renaissance, and their many uses are gaining interest among diverse audiences.
With psychedelics thus embedded in group process in these cultures, and with clearly delineated cultural goals and group ingestion within a religious framework directing the personal experience, there is little room for these people to develop a dependence on hallucinogens.
Such psychotherapeutic applications, explored in more than 1,000 papers and dozens of books in the 1950s and '60s, were largely forgotten in the hysteria prompted by the widespread recreational use of psychedelics.
Beginning with observational methods, Berlin, Guthrie, Weider, Goodell and Wolff (1955) studied the effects of LSD and mescaline on four nationally recognized visual artists, noting specifically (based on the assessment of a panel of art critics) that work influenced by psychedelics had the qualities of bolder lines and more vivid colors.
Although illicit drug use was rising, there was little working scientific knowledge about psychedelics among the chemists assisting law enforcement.
Both Hunter and Kesey were first exposed to powerful psychedelics such as LSD, mescaline, and psilocybin as volunteers in government military research in the early '60s.
After observing some striking examples of people who claimed to have overcome serious personal problems (including a severe stutter and oppressive guilt) with the help of MDMA, Shulgin introduced the drug to a psychologist he knew who had already used psychedelics as an aid to therapy.
LSD, psilocybin and MDMA, although the latter association may reflect the extremely high overlap between MDMA users and users of the "full" psychedelics LSD or psilocybin in this sample.
Scientists at Zurich University said that the psychedelics could give patients 'a new perspective' helping them to see their pain and problems in a different light.
Earlier reviews of psychedelics in parapsychology exist (Blewett, 1963; Krippner & Davidson, 1974; Parker, 1975; Rogo, 1976; Wilson, 1949) and these have been incorporated into the current paper, yet a systcmatic analysis of the empirical research to date is overdue.