public company

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Related to Publicly traded: Publicly traded companies

public company

n
(Accounting & Book-keeping) a limited company whose shares may be purchased by the public and traded freely on the open market and whose share capital is not less than a statutory minimum; public limited company. Compare private company
Translations

public company

nsocietà f inv per azioni quotata in borsa
References in periodicals archive ?
As states increase their contracting with health plans, a significant percentage of these plans are owned by publicly traded companies.
Best has released 15 stock indexes covering publicly traded companies in sectors of the United States and global insurance industry.
The ELC found that today 32% of the top 500 publicly traded companies have no African American board directors and 58% have at least one.
Minnihan's questions, and our responses, are below and should aid California practitioners who audit publicly traded companies.
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is one of the largest publicly traded energy partnerships with an enterprise value of approximately $18 billion, and is a North American provider of midstream energy services to producers and consumers of natural gas, NGLs and crude oil.
The stock prices of black-owned, publicly traded companies have generally improved in the last four years, but some of these companies have suffered major setbacks and their stock has subsequently fallen off its respective index.
This business reform bill, enacted in the wake of a series of corporate scandals starting with the bankruptcy of energy giant Enron, largely applies to publicly traded companies.