perfect competition

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perfect competition

n
(Economics) economics a market situation in which there exists a homogeneous product, freedom of entry, and a large number of buyers and sellers none of whom individually can affect price
References in periodicals archive ?
As economies become more efficient, and industries fall into pure competition markets, the opportunity gaps to deliver an alpha become less evident.
Big money, not pure competition, has become our commitment.
Some of the tensions can be chalked up to pure competition.
That doesn't stop at pure competition or physical activity.
Rather than integrate this criterion to justify a more flexible competition policy approach during the crisis (reduced fines for financially unstable companies, more opportunity for state aid), it would appear that a pure competition logic is being put into practice, which wants to see the disappearance of a non-viable company from the market.
He had a blackboard in his office and once, in the heat of discussion with some of us, he allowed me to write something on it that I thought was quite profound at the time: I wrote: "There is no competition in pure competition.
Friedberg contributes an informative, although not entirely novel, history of modern US-China relations: from the almost pure competition between the United States and China since the founding of the PRC; to strategic cooperation throughout the latter half of the Cold War; to the mixed strategy of "congagement" that has defined US policy for the past two decades.
Once a firm is able to establish this preference, thorough its reputation, it is less subject to the forces of chance or randomness, as it would be if it operated in an environment of pure competition.
Particular behaviors exist on a continuum of pure competition on one end and pure cooperation on the other.
We're told that winning isn't everything, that cheats never prosper, that a desire to win at all costs is the province of cold-eyed, cold-hearted fanatics who have lost sight of the beauty of pure competition.
The credibility and usefulness of the pure competition model (and the supply and demand analysis which issues from it) are significantly enhanced by this analysis.
The second main paradox is that the rules of pure competition have to be enforced by an administrative body, the regulation Agency.