puritan

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Pu·ri·tan

 (pyo͝or′ĭ-tn)
n.
1. A member of a group of English Protestants who in the 1500s and 1600s advocated strict religious discipline along with simplification of the ceremonies and creeds of the Church of England.
2. puritan A person who is very strict or austere in religious practice or moral outlook, especially someone who regards pleasure or luxury as sinful.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Puritans or Puritanism.
2. puritan Characteristic of a puritan; puritanical.

[From Late Latin pūritās, purity (on the model of Medieval Latin Kathari, "the Pure Ones," a third-century sect of rigorist heretics), from Latin pūrus, pure; see peuə- in Indo-European roots.]

puritan

(ˈpjʊərɪtən)
n
a person who adheres to strict moral or religious principles, esp one opposed to luxury and sensual enjoyment
adj
characteristic of a puritan
[C16: from Late Latin pūritās purity]
ˈpuritanˌism n

Puritan

(in the late 16th and 17th centuries ˈpjʊərɪtən)
n
1. (Protestantism) any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
2. (Historical Terms) any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
adj
3. (Historical Terms) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Puritans
4. (Protestantism) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Puritans
ˈPuritanˌism n

Pu•ri•tan

(ˈpyʊər ɪ tn)

n.
1. a member of a group of Protestants that arose in the 16th century within the Church of England, demanding the simplification of doctrine and worship and greater strictness in religious discipline.
2. (l.c.) a person who is strict in moral or religious matters.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Puritans.
4. (l.c.) puritanical.
[1540–50; < Late Latin pūrit(ās) purity]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Puritan - a member of a group of English Protestants who in the 16th and 17th centuries thought that the Protestant Reformation under Elizabeth was incomplete and advocated the simplification and regulation of forms of worship
Protestant - an adherent of Protestantism
2.puritan - someone who adheres to strict religious principlespuritan - someone who adheres to strict religious principles; someone opposed to sensual pleasures
abstainer, ascetic - someone who practices self denial as a spiritual discipline
3.puritan - a person excessively concerned about propriety and decorum
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable

puritan

noun
1. moralist, fanatic, zealot, prude, pietist, rigorist He delighted in dealing with subjects that enraged puritans.
adjective
1. strict, austere, puritanical, narrow, severe, intolerant, ascetic, narrow-minded, moralistic, prudish, hidebound, strait-laced Paul has always had a puritan streak.
Quotations
"The Puritan hated bear-baiting, not because it gave pain to the bear, but because it gave pleasure to the spectators" [Lord Macaulay History of England]

puritan

noun
A person who is too much concerned with being proper, modest, or righteous:
Informal: old maid.
Translations
بيوريتاني: مُتَزَمِّت في أمور الدّينمُتَزَمِّت ، مُتَشَدِّد
-kapuritán
asketpuritaner
puritán
púrítanipúrítani, siîavandur/strangtrúaîur maîur
puritonaspuritoniškas
puritānis
puritán
Püritensofta/bağnaz kimse

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən]
A. ADJpuritano
B. Npuritano/a m/f

Puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən] n (RELIGION)puritain(e) m/f

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtən] n (= puritanical person) → puritain(e) m/f

puritan

(Rel: also Puritan)
adjpuritanisch
nPuritaner(in) m(f)

puritan

[ˈpjʊərɪtn] adj & npuritano/a

puritan

(ˈpjuəritən) noun
1. a person who is strict and disapproves of many kinds of enjoyment.
2. formerly, in England and America, a member of a religious group wanting to make church worship etc simpler and plainer.
ˌpuriˈtanical (-ˈtӕ-) adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
He returned in 1559 as a leader of the Puritan Party.
On the one hand, the term describes a moderate and relatively mainstream movement toward more elaborate expressions of Protestant piety in art, architecture, and worship, a "spirit of renewal running through the Stuart Church" (91) that more or less comfortably accommodated all but the "radical wing" (104) of the Puritan party.
Barker, after all, stressed that Milton, while indebted to the ideology of Puritanism, belonged to no one Puritan party since he believed that none offered a wholly satisfactory program.