Pushtu


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Push·tu

 (pŭsh′to͞o)
n.
Variant of Pashto.

Pash•to

(ˈpʌʃ toʊ)

also Push•tu

(-tu)

n.
the Iranian language of the Pashtuns: an official language of Afghanistan.
Translations
pashto
References in classic literature ?
Otherwise' - this was in Pushtu for decency's sake -'thou wouldst have ended thy meditations upon the sultry side of Hell - being an unbeliever and an idolater for all thy child's simplicity.
said the lama, as the rough Pushtu rumbled into the red beard.
Khumariyan, a Pushtu music instrumental band having a focus on instrumental music, came up with some traditional and contemporary music; Amir Shafique was on the guitar, Farhan Bogra played the rubab and Shiraz Khan a traditional music instrument.
DG PNCA Jamal Shah lauding the contribution of the Pushtu folk artist, said that PNCA arranged a event to pay tribute to the services of folk singer in the field of folk singing.
Abdul Qadir Khan was a qualified teacher of Pushtu and Urdu and had passed the necessary examinations held by the board of examiners appointed by the Government of India.
Sindhi, Pushtu and Balochi languages are not considered as tag languages on the users like Punjabi which is a tag Language for the people of the lower class.
He only understands Pushtu and is quite slow in processing things.
PESHAWAR -- Popular Pushtu singer Ghazal Jawed murder case's key character, her former husband, was formally charge sheeted in a local court of Friday.
2) The Rules of Jihad established for Mujahideen by the Leadership of Afghanistan Islamic Emirates, Pushtu translation.
Two of these are the official languages of the country, Pushtu and Persian.
The second vehicle, this time a large truck we called "Burbahayka" from Pushtu "buru bahai" which means something like "let's go," would not repeat the fate of the first one and stopped short of the opening, letting a small force of enemy fighters disembark to join in the fight.
Afghan Pushtu saw an astounding growth curve, from zero enrollments in 2006 to 95 in 2009.