quantum cryptography

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quantum cryptography

n.
Any of various techniques that exploit quantum-mechanical phenomena, such as superposition or quantum entanglement, to generate and share between two parties a private key that can be used to encrypt and decrypt data. Current techniques also reveal any attempt to intercept the private key during its creation.

quantum cryptography

n
(Atomic Physics) a method of coding information based on quantum mechanics, which is said to be unbreakable
Translations
cryptographie quantique
References in periodicals archive ?
Like many QKD systems, Islam's key transmitter uses a weakened laser to encode information on individual photons of light.
China is already using satellite-based QKD in some metropolitan areas, combined with fiber optic cable systems, to set up a large network of quantum communication across the sprawling country.
To realize the security even with a noisy quantum channel, we need to modify the original QKD protocol.
It is interesting to compare the key rates from QKD networks which were constructed in previous years.
QKD is already a reality, although limited in capability.
But the beauty of the QKD protocol is that if anyone was to attempt to intercept a quantum key, it would alter the quantum states of the photons and alert users that the key is under attack.
QKD includes the following protocols: protocols using single (non-entangled) qubits (two-level quantum systems) and qudits (d-level quantum systems, d>2) (Bennett et al.
QKD systems use quantum states, such as polarization, to encode information on single photons.
Applications for a high-speed QKD system might include distribution of sensitive remote video, such as satellite imagery or commercially valuable material such as intellectual property, or confidential healthcare and financial data.
QKD isn't so expensive, probably comparable to a high-grade firewall - in the range of tens of thousands of pounds.
Norbert Lutkenhaus, one of the world's experts in QKD and Associate Professor at the Physics Department of the University of Waterloo and a member of the Institute of Quantum Computing; and George Heron, a leading expert on the application of security and vice president and chief scientist at McAfee, Inc.
The other is an optical-fiber-based QKD system optimized for use with single-photon emitters by employing superconducting single-photon detectors(4) with ultra-low-noise characteristics.