qasida


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qasida

(kəˈsiːdə)
n
(Poetry) an Arabic poem of mourning or praise
References in periodicals archive ?
HJF: I am primarily interested in the formal and rhetorical changes from the qasida to the free verse poem and then the prose poem.
Poet Majed Nusairat has written two poems: 'Schizophrenia Al Qasida (Poem Schizophrenia)' about which he said: "The meaning can be interpreted, the idea is emerged via a proof, a flower of almonds in exile, which dresses in white and titles.
With Islamic conquests, both the qasida and the ghazal traveled eastward as well as westward and adapted to cultures as varied and distant as Spanish, Indian, German, Turkish and was utilized in numerous languages and dialects across the world, but the ghazals Persian transmutation/iteration came to be definitive.
The first collection betrays a precocious formal experimentation with the traditional qasida, several poems adopting a single hemstitch form and varying rhymes, verging on free verse.
net/library/englisharticles/qasida/) Qasida al-Burda , which venerates the Prophet, who is said to have cured the poet of partial paralysis.
The Rhetorical Fabric of the Traditional Arabic Qasida in Its Formative Stages: A Comparative Study of the Rhetoric in Two Traditional Poems by 'Alqama l-Fahl and Bashshar b.
L'artiste Abbas Righi a la voix cristalline donne le ton entamant son tableau avec la qasida [beaucoup moins que] Ya bahi El Djamel [beaucoup plus grand que] dans une ambiance conviviale, accueillante, toute empreinte de nostalgie et de poesie, nourrie par des ovations ininterrompues.
In other parts of Africa, for translators and scholars, to be poetic the language is forced to fit within the schemes of the qasida (an Arabic poetic genre) or of the sonnet: the ideology of the written model permeates all conceptions of poetry, and prevents the understanding of its essential performative, vocal nature within a speech community.
A qasida by A'sha Hamdan (who died in the revolt), lamenting the tragic defeat against the Turks just two years earlier, testifies to the state of mind of the troops at the eastern border; see al-Baladhuri, 7: 307-8 (a partial translation can be found in Bosworth 1968: 55).
Anvari was accused of libel on Balkh people and was infuriated by them, after that, he refuged to Hamid al-din in a Qasida and survived due to his steadfastness.
Alavi reports that on the death of his spiritual master, Amroti, al-Udvi composed a qasida (elegy poem) in Arabic language, published in the newspaper, al-Wahid, which was highly appreciated by many scholars.
84], who said in a qasida entitled, Nahj al-Dimatha: "wa a'dala dhu-l-tasbi'i mubhama qasdihi // fa-zalla bihi al-jammu al-ghafiru fa-jahila" i.