qasida

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qasida

(kəˈsiːdə)
n
(Poetry) an Arabic poem of mourning or praise
References in periodicals archive ?
Ahmad Shawqi: The Classical Arabic Qasidah at the turn of the twentiethcentury.
The Readers Cup and Qasidah par Coeur competitions give students the chance to put their reading and performance poetry skills to the test.
Summary: Performing Roald Dahl's The Crocodile, Kishore pipped four other finalists to the post in the Hamdan Bin Mohammed Heritage Centre Qasidah Par Coeur competition at the Emirates Airline Festival of Literature.
This year also marks the most successful year for the Festival's many annual student competitions with increases in entries for the Oxford University Press Story Writing Competition and the Taaleem Award as well as the number of participants in the Hamdan bin Mohammed Heritage Center Qasidah par Coeur performance poetry competition.
If not for anything else, he will always be remembered among the Muslims for his famous qasidah on the Prophet - Muhammad sal-lal-lahu alaih wa sal-lam (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him): Balagal 'ula be-ka-malihi kashafad-duja be-ja-malihi .
Hamdan Bin Mohammed Heritage Center Qasidah Par Coeur Competition is a performance-based poetry competition that will test the participants' ability to perform the spoken word.
Recently, the lower court had awarded one-year jail term to Awad Al Sawafi, Rashid Al Badi, Essa Al Masoodi, Osama Al Tawayh, Hilal Al Busaidi, Bsam Abu Qasidah, Eshaq Al Badi, Mohammed Al Kuyumi, Abdullah Al Abdaly and Ahmed Al Maamari for violating the Information Technology (IT) regulations and lEaEAEEeA se majestEaEAEEe.
Roger Allen, An Introduction to Arabic Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000), 1-5; Booth, "On Translation and Madness"; Clark, "Arabic Literature Unveiled," 15-22; Andre Lefevere, "Translation: Poetics, The Case of the Missing Qasidah," in his Translation, Rewriting, and the Manipulation of Literary Fame (New York: Routledge, 1992), 73-86.
Stetkevych recognizes this difference, as she cursorily notes: "given the Islamic context in which this qasidah has come down to us, the closing verses of its nasib are striking for two elements of diction that have an eminently Qur'anic resonance" (41).
It will feature specimens of calligraphy by fifteen prominent calligraphers who have displayed their skills in presenting Ahadiths that give a description of what the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) looked like and in presenting selected verses from the famous Qasidah Burdah Sharif celebrating the Prophets personage.
to use such verse forms as the qasidah, the ghazal, and the masnavi to
Kadhim, The Poetics of Anti-Colonialism in the Arabic Qasidah (Leiden: Brill, 2004).