Qu'Appelle River


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Qu'Ap·pelle River

 (kwə-pĕl′)
A river, about 430 km (270 mi) long, of southern Saskatchewan and southwest Manitoba, Canada, flowing east to the Assiniboine River.
References in periodicals archive ?
Saskatchewan-based researcher and guide Jeff Matity spoke of the fish he pursues on the Qu'Appelle River lakes--Last Mountain and Diefenbaker--which flow into the Red River of the North and eventually to Lake Winnipeg.
It will also be better equipped to protect the surrounding environment, including the Qu'Appelle River a major continental waterway that supports many aquatic species and rare or endangered native plant species.
This April and May, as the water began rising in the Qu'Appelle River from the spring run-off, sandbagging took place on along the creek.
The son of a NWC wintering partner and the nephew of one of that company's founders, Grant was posted to Fort Esperance (now in Saskatchewan) on the Qu'Appelle River in 1812.
See also Giraud, The Metis in the Canadian West, 1:450: "The correspondence of Duncan Cameron and Cuthbert Grant revealed the organization of a new force of BoisBrules whose members, recruited in the region of Fort Dauphin, Fort des Prairies, the Churchill River, and the Qu'Appelle River, would sweep away in the coming spring the last vestiges of the colony that presumed to defy the wishes of their nation.
The Regina police and RCMP have searched an area along the Qu'Appelle River, about 75 kilometres north of the city on the lands of Muscowpetung First nation, Pasqua First nation, and Echo Valley Provincial Park.
It's a perfect masterpiece of natural landscape-brush, water and sky in the valley of the Qu'Appelle River.
The Lower Qu'Appelle River watershed is located in southeastern Saskatchewan and is part of the Qu'Appelle River basin.
The Qu'Appelle River, which runs from Lake Diefenbaker, northwest of Regina, across Saskatchewan to the Manitoba boundary, is expected to overflow along the entire Qu'Appelle Valley.
About three miles farther north, the Qu'Appelle River enters the Assiniboine from the west, and it also flows through a deep and picturesque valley.
Built on reserve land along the Qu'Appelle River, the longest run is more than a kilometre in length.
Smith's excavation of the Lebret site, a campsite on the Qu'Appelle River valley, revealed that plains groups had long exploited the nearby fishery.