quantity theory

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Related to Quantity theory of money: Velocity of money

quantity theory

n
(Economics) economics a theory stating that the general price level varies directly with the quantity of money in circulation and the velocity with which it is circulated, and inversely with the volume of production expressed by the total number of money transactions
References in periodicals archive ?
Adhering to the dominant quantity theory of money, says Tymoigne (economics, California State U.
They are the Quantity Theory of Money, Keynes's Liquidity Preference Theory, Friedman's Modern Quantity Theory of Money, and the Baumol-Tobin Model.
He gives no prominence to David Hume's 1752 essay "Of Money" as the foundation of the classical quantity theory of money and the forced-saving doctrine, restated by the likes of Bentham, Henry Thornton, Ricardo, and J.
The paper finds that an increase in money supply over the long-run results in a higher rate of inflation and thus provides support for the quantity theory of money.
Aggregate demand will be equivalent to the simple quantity theory of money.
In teaching the quantity theory of money, many students have difficulty with understanding the theory itself and the terms in that equation.
Models of inflation without the output gap include the equation of exchange of the quantity theory of money, the real interest rate gap, and two versions of themodel.
This paper specifies and estimates a modern version of the quantity theory of money growth, real GDP growth, and inflation.
When all is said and done, Wicksell, the Austrians, and the Stockholm school writers accepted and extended the two key lynchpins of the British neoclassical orthodoxy--the quantity theory of money and the loanable funds theory of interest rate determination, though no where in the book does Laidler explicitly use the term "loanable funds".
The first was Keynes' rejection of the quantity theory of money as the basis for conducting monetary policy, a theory he inherited from his English predecessors and he himself had embraced and to which he contributed earlier in his professional career.
This early view of the influence of money on prices came to be known as the quantity theory of money.
According to the quantity theory of money, a 1 percent increase in velocity has the same effect on the inflation rate as a 1 percent increase in money growth.