ballistic missile

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ballistic missile

n.
A projectile that assumes a free-falling trajectory after an internally guided, self-powered ascent.

ballistic missile

n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a missile that has no wings or fins and that follows a ballistic trajectory when its propulsive power is discontinued

ballis′tic mis′sile


n.
a missile that travels to its target unpowered and unguided after being launched.
[1950–55]

ballistic missile

Any missile which does not rely upon aerodynamic surfaces to produce lift and consequently follows a ballistic trajectory when thrust is terminated. See also aerodynamic missile; guided missile.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ballistic missile - a missile that is guided in the first part of its flight but falls freely as it approaches targetballistic missile - a missile that is guided in the first part of its flight but falls freely as it approaches target
ICBM, intercontinental ballistic missile - a ballistic missile that is capable of traveling from one continent to another
missile - a rocket carrying a warhead of conventional or nuclear explosives; may be ballistic or directed by remote control
Translations
صاروخٌ قَذائِفي
balistická střela
ballistisk raket/missil
missile balistique
ballisztikus rakéta
skotflaug
balistinė raketa
ballistiskā raķete
balistická strela
balistik füze

ballistic missile

ballistic missile

(bəˈlistik ˈmisail)
a missile guided for part of its course but falling like an ordinary bomb.
References in periodicals archive ?
The photoacoustic technique enables imaging deeper into tissues than optical imaging methods that utilize ballistic or quasiballistic photons (e.
Milan's second article, "Aperiodic conductivity oscillations in quasiballistic graphene heterojunctions," establishes a new signature of Klein tunneling in graphene heterojunctions.
In a second article titled "Aperiodic conductivity oscillations in quasiballistic graphene heterojunctions" the team has demonstrated that carrier transport in a field-effect transistor made from graphene is governed by the phenomena of Klein-tunneling, even in the presence of materials impurities.