tu quoque

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Related to Quoque: tu quoque

tu quo·que

 (to͞o kwō′kwē, -kwā, tyo͞o)
n.
A retort accusing an accuser of a similar offense or similar behavior.

[Latin tū quoque, you also : , you + quoque, also.]

tu quoque

(tjuː ˈkwəʊkwɪ)
interj
you likewise: a retort made by a person accused of a crime implying that the accuser is also guilty of the same crime

tu quoque

A Latin phrase meaning you also, used by someone being accused to accuse the accuser of the same crime.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Tiberius said to Galba, Tu quoque, Galba, degustabis imperium.
Erat quoque in eodem loco unica spinosa arbor, brevis admodum (quam nos ipsi nostris propriis oculis vidimus).
They would in you,' I retorted, and my tu quoque shut him up and seemed to puzzle him.
Populus Dei sanctus de munere quoque prophetico Christi participat, vivum Eius testimonium maxime per vitam fidei ac caritatis diftundendo, et Deo hostiam laudis offerendo, fructum labiorum confitentium nomini Eius (cf.
The tu quoque defense, roundly rejected in international criminal tribunals, also calls into question the authority of the entity that sits in judgment.
Hyacinthus: (Me quoque Hyacinthus: (His formidable tremenda dignitas timidum majesty makes me afraid, too.
Rerum ipsa natura in eo, quod praecipue indulsisse homini videtur quoque nos a ceteris animalibus separasse, non parens, sed noverca fuerit, si facultatem dicendi, sociam scelerum, adversam innocentiae, hostem veritatis invenit.
Haec celebrent omnes linguis moteta Magistri Francisci Guerreri Et celebrent coetera membra quoque.
Small wonder, then, that in the Plautine hypotext for the Shakespearian play, Menaechmus' meddling wife is described as a portitor ('customs official', 114) and that the play ends with her being auctioned off in a sexist way: Venibit uxor quoque etiam, siquis emptor venerit ('His wife will also be sold, should any purchaser turn up', 1160).
Thomae in libros Aristotelis sequens encomium protulmit: 'optimos quoque ex interpretibus secuti (sumus), et praesertim sanctum Thomam, qui quia ingenio fuit Aristoteli simillimus, ita Aristotelem explicat, ut non alius Aristotelem, sed Aristoteles seipsum explicate videatur' (Arist.
10) See for instance the summary of creation before that of Adam and Eve: "Vestita diversis terra germinibus virebat omnis, coelum quoque sole et luna, geminis vultus sui luminibus, stellarumque insignitum decore fulgebat" ("The entire earth was now arrayed in its verdant garb of diverse plants.
My fellow libertarians attempt a tu quoque reductio ad absurdum against my critique of Klein and Clark (2010): "If certain Rothbardian libertarians would protest our talk of indirect effects or overall liberty for its supposedly presuming to know the future, for its supposedly neglecting Frank Knightian uncertainty, or for its acceptance of an only vaguely defined notion of the greater good, would the same charges not work here against Block?