RNA


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RNA
A. adenine
U. uracil
C. cytosine
G. guanine

RNA

 (är′ĕn-ā′)
n.
A nucleic acid present in all living cells and many viruses, consisting of a long, usually single-stranded chain of alternating phosphate and ribose units, with one of the bases adenine, guanine, cytosine, or uracil bonded to each ribose molecule. RNA molecules are involved in protein synthesis and sometimes in the transmission of genetic information. Also called ribonucleic acid.

[r(ibo)n(ucleic) a(cid).]

RNA

n
(Biochemistry) biochem ribonucleic acid; any of a group of nucleic acids, present in all living cells, that play an essential role in the synthesis of proteins. On hydrolysis they yield the pentose sugar ribose, the purine bases adenine and guanine, the pyrimidine bases cytosine and uracil, and phosphoric acid. See also messenger RNA, transfer RNA, ribosomal RNA, DNA

RNA

ribonucleic acid: any of a class of single-stranded nucleic acid molecules of ribose and uracil, found chiefly in the cytoplasm of cells and in certain viruses; important in protein synthesis and in the transmission of genetic information transcribed from DNA. Compare messenger RNA, ribosomal RNA, transfer RNA.
[1945–50]
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RNA
A: adenine
C: cytosine
U: uracil
G: guanine

RNA

(är′ĕn-ā′)
Short for ribonucleic acid. The nucleic acid that determines protein synthesis in all living cells and the genetic makeup of many viruses. RNA consists of a single strand of nucleotides in a variety of lengths and shapes and is mainly produced in the cell nucleus. ♦ Messenger RNA is RNA that carries genetic information from the cell nucleus to the structures in the cytoplasm (known as ribosomes) where protein synthesis takes place. ♦ Transfer RNA is RNA that delivers the amino acids necessary for protein synthesis to the ribosomes. Compare DNA.

RNA

ribonucleic acid.
See also: Heredity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.RNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer of nucleotides found in the nucleus but mainly in the cytoplasm of a cell where it is associated with microsomes; it transmits genetic information from DNA to the cytoplasm and controls certain chemical processes in the cell; "ribonucleic acid is the genetic material of some viruses"
biochemistry - the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organisms; the effort to understand biology within the context of chemistry
ribose - a pentose sugar important as a component of ribonucleic acid
adenine, A - (biochemistry) purine base found in DNA and RNA; pairs with thymine in DNA and with uracil in RNA
cytosine, C - a base found in DNA and RNA and derived from pyrimidine; pairs with guanine
informational RNA, messenger RNA, mRNA, template RNA - the template for protein synthesis; the form of RNA that carries information from DNA in the nucleus to the ribosome sites of protein synthesis in the cell
nRNA, nuclear RNA - ribonucleic acid found in the nucleolus of the cell
acceptor RNA, soluble RNA, transfer RNA, tRNA - RNA molecules present in the cell (in at least 20 varieties, each variety capable of combining with a specific amino acid) that attach the correct amino acid to the protein chain that is being synthesized at the ribosome of the cell (according to directions coded in the mRNA)
guanine, G - a purine base found in DNA and RNA; pairs with cytosine
nucleic acid - (biochemistry) any of various macromolecules composed of nucleotide chains that are vital constituents of all living cells
polymer - a naturally occurring or synthetic compound consisting of large molecules made up of a linked series of repeated simple monomers
U, uracil - a base containing nitrogen that is found in RNA (but not in DNA) and derived from pyrimidine; pairs with adenine
Translations
рибонуклеинова киселинаРНК
ribonukleiinihappoRNA
RNS
RKS
ribonukleīnskābeRNS
ARN
ribonukleová kyselinaRNK

RNA

N ABBR =ribonucleic acidARN m

RNA

[ˌɑːrɛnˈeɪ] n abbr (=ribonucleic acid) → ARN m

RNA

abbr of ribonucleic acidRNS f

RNA

[ˌɑːrɛnˈeɪ] n abbr (Biochemistry) =ribonucleic acidRNA

RNA

V. ribonucleic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus information was transferred from the DNA in the chromosome to the messenger RNA, which traveled out from the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm and gave the information to the transfer-RNA molecules, which transferred the information to the amino acids and formed the protein.
The RNA program began around March 1927 and changed little in its first 50 years, building up a stable of only 127 officially designated sites.
Progress in understanding the biological functions of RNA requires that investigators are up to date in the advances of many fields.
Working out the structure of RNA polymerase was "a marvelous achievement," says James T.
To conserve samples we did not confirm positive results by RIBA but instead tested for virus in plasma by using a real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay for HCV RNA developed in our laboratory.
RNA regulatory molecules either reduce or eliminate target gene expression by binding mRNA and targeting it for degradation by cellular enzymes.
Very few reports have focused on the nature of circulating extracellular RNA and the possible mechanisms by which RNA is protected from plasma RNase activity.
BCC's goal for this study is to determine the status of current and emerging RNA interference (RNAi) technologies and products and to assess their worldwide growth potential over a 5-year period, from 2008 to 2013.
First, a quick refresher on the chemical difference between RNA and DNA.
While magnetic beads have been incorporated to replace most gel steps in other types of library prep, most small RNA library prep protocols still required an acrylamide gel size selection for library purification.
It helps knit together a "copy" strand of RNA, using an original RNA strand as a reference or "template.
Accurate detection of gene expression is influenced by status of the RNA that is isolated from tissues.