Akiba ben Joseph

(redirected from Rabbi Akiba)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

A·ki·ba ben Jo·seph

 (ä-kē′bä bĕn jō′zəf, -səf, ə-kē′və) ad 50?-135.
Jewish religious leader whose scholarship, particularly a reinterpretation of the Halakah, profoundly influenced Judaism.

A•ki•ba ben Jo•seph

(ɑˈki bɑ bɛn ˈdʒoʊ zəf, -səf, əˈki və)
n.
a.d. c50–c135, rabbi, scholar, and martyr.
Also called A•ki′ba.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those values are best seen in Leviticus 19:18, "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself," which won the passionate endorsement of Rabbi Hillel, Jesus, Paul, and Rabbi Akiba, among others.
Moses is then imagined visiting the classroom of Rabbi Akiba, said to be able to derive many balakbot from these crowns.
It is presented musically through a selection of the most beautiful psalms of King David as preserved in the ancient musical tradition of the Jews of southern Morocco, along with a piece on the 1st century Rabbi Akiba, one of the most important fathers of rabbinical Judaism.
Adumbrating this essential teaching, Rabbi Akiba teaches the world, "This is a great principle of the Torah.
In BBC Two's God on Trial, about Jews awaiting the gas chambers in Auschwitz and debating the justification for God, he plays Rabbi Akiba, a man who finds his faith severely challenged.
In BBC Two's God on Trial, about Jews awaiting the gas chambers in Auschwitz and debating the justification for God, Sir Antony plays Rabbi Akiba, a man who finds his faith severely challenged.
19:19) was considered by the second century Rabbi Akiba to be the great principle of the Torah.
Rabbi Akiba, the preeminent Tanna, symbolizes what is transcendent and other- worldly in the Mishnah.
There is a midrash in the Talmud, about Moses and the Talmudic sage Rabbi Akiba.
Midrashic activity reached its height in the 2nd century CE with the schools of Rabbi Ishmael ben Elisha and Rabbi Akiba ben Joseph.
Then, at one point, the students said to Rabbi Akiba, "Rabbi, how do you know this?
Based on these considerations it argues that the three earlier figures, Shimon ben Azzai, Shimon ben Zoma, and Elisha ben Abuyah (Aher) are presented as antitypes to the ideal Rabbi Akiba, who embodies qualities that each of the others lacks.