Rabelaisian


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Rab·e·lai·si·an

 (răb′ə-lā′zē-ən, -zhən)
adj.
1. Of or relating to Rabelais or his works.
2. Characterized by coarse humor or bold caricature.

Rabelaisian

(ˌræbəˈleɪzɪən; -ʒən)
adj
of, relating to, or resembling the work of Rabelais, esp by broad, often bawdy humour and sharp satire
n
a student or admirer of Rabelais
ˌRabeˈlaisianism n

Rab•e•lai•si•an

(ˌræb əˈleɪ zi ən, -ʒən)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or suggesting Rabelais or his broad, coarse humor.
[1855–60]

Rabelaisian

1. a person who imitates or is an enthusiast for the works of Francois Rabelais.
2. a person given to coarse, satirical humor, like that of Rabelais. — Rabelaisian, adj.
See also: Humor
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Rabelaisian - of or relating to or characteristic of Francois Rabelais or his works; "Rabelaisian characters"
Translations

Rabelaisian

[ˌræbəˈleɪzɪən] ADJrabelasiano

Rabelaisian

adj
(of Rabelais)des Rabelais
(= like Rabelais)im Stile Rabelais’
References in classic literature ?
They were alone in the hotel but for a fat Frenchwoman of middle age, a Rabelaisian figure with a broad, obscene laugh.
Her lively reportage combines interviews, mountain hikes, visits to fire labs, and even her game attempts to keep up with hotshot trainees and the Station 8 firefighters during their rigorous workouts and Rabelaisian bacony feasts.
Thats all to the good, but what really sets him apart and causes fellow attorneys that hes worked with from around the country to contact him for seasonal progress updates is his Rabelaisian approach to backyard gardening.
The tide ebbs and flows, tyranny prevails, freedom wins, the oppressive elite returns, many are aggrieved, some are glad, most are concerned only with immediate wants-and humanity is a rancorous, Rabelaisian parade with knaves and heroes, creatures of all varieties, pursuing rainbows of all colors, and all marching off to.
Winner of Hungary's 2006 Aegon Literary Award, this Rabelaisian saga recounts the Job-like sufferings of the apparently feckless, lovelorn, often sex-starved Uriel, a Jewish citizen of Julio-Claudian Rome.
Rabelaisian vividness, but not in the spirit of any nihilistic fuck you, this is shit; rather, in the spirit O'Hara's "I want to be / at least as alive as the vulgar," to be as open as your asshole is to me: "Into the anus of the other the cock nudges / like a green thumb.
In a kitchen scene sizzling with Rabelaisian revelry, monsters dexterously dodge a siege of woks, steamers and sashimi knives; Yao Chen, playing a master chef, comedienne and "Weibo queen," demonstrates the sophistication and barbarity of Chinese cuisine with a balletic act as high-spirited as it is spine-chilling.
As an existential thinker, he is fascinated by the human mind and the human predicament, yet, as a Rabelaisian human being, laughter and joy are the reasons he gets up in the morning.
A case in point is the reading of "The cow in apple time", where the cow becomes a grotesque, improper, and Rabelaisian body threatening the social order, or "In the home stretch", which Kosc traces back to the legacy of the nineteenth-century portrait-poem.
In the true Rabelaisian spirit of that culture - a spirit characterized by a kind of extravagant humor inherited from Francois Rabelais, the French Renaissance writer, monk and scholar whose bawdy satire earned him a permanent place in Western literature - the Parisian publication offended not just Muslims, but also Jews and Catholics, liberals and conservatives, along with elitist intellectuals, high-minded politicians and pious popes.
Barbour cites many of Browne's quirky observations (such as the direction in which an elephant farts, 438) but leaves his reader unenlightened as to whether insatiable curiosity and amusement are in any way linked, and, for this reviewer, Barbour's impassiveness to potentially humorous, almost Rabelaisian, aspect of his subject is one minor drawback of this insatiable study.
In the first chapter of the book, Bakhtin identifies Rabelaisian writing as "grotesque," stating that Rabelais and his influence on later writers present an imagery that is "filled with an almost Rabelaisian grotesque life" (Rabelais 61).