desegregation

(redirected from Racial desegregation)
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Related to Racial desegregation: School desegregation

de·seg·re·gate

 (dē-sĕg′rĭ-gāt′)
v. de·seg·re·gat·ed, de·seg·re·gat·ing, de·seg·re·gates
v.tr.
1. To abolish or eliminate segregation in.
2. To open (a school or workplace, for example) to members of all races or ethnic groups, especially by force of law.
v.intr.
To become open to members of all races or ethnic groups.

de·seg′re·ga′tion n.
de·seg′re·ga′tion·ist n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.desegregation - the action of incorporating a racial or religious group into a community
group action - action taken by a group of people

desegregation

noun
The act, process, or result of abolishing racial segregation:
Translations
déségrégation

desegregation

[ˈdiːˌsegrəˈgeɪʃən] Nabolición f de la segregación

desegregation

[ˌdiːsɛgrɪˈgeɪʃən] n [schools] → déségrégation f
racial desegregation → déségrégation raciale

desegregation

nAufhebung fder Rassentrennung (→ of in +dat), → Desegregation f

desegregation

[ˈdiːˌsɛgrɪˈgeɪʃn] nabolizione f della segregazione razziale
References in periodicals archive ?
ROSA PARKS, AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS ACTIVIST WHO IN 1955 REFUSED TO GIVE UP HER SEAT ON A BUS TO A WHITE PASSENGER AND SET INTO MOTION RACIAL DESEGREGATION IN THE US
Pierce and others were speaking of the humiliating sacrifice Conrad was forced to make as a student in the 1950s when racial desegregation in the South was in its earliest stages.
Because of its ultimate impact on racial desegregation, the Federal Highway Administration has called the Alaska Highway the road to civil rights.
The author notes that while Hollings was for racial desegregation in education, he was for the Vietnam War.
These institutions were also commonly located in relatively isolated, rural areas that were not necessarily favorable to racial desegregation or civil rights for African Americans.
Private litigation in federal court to promote racial desegregation would most likely have to be based on constitutional violations, (242) a resource-intensive strategy that deserves more attention.
Board of Education of Topeka decision and subsequent decisions ended the "separate but equal" doctrine applied to public schools and led to implementation of court-ordered racial desegregation plans for school districts across the country.
Sixty years later, one could agree, based on this finding, racial desegregation is not yet complete and that greater, more intensive policy measures (both within and outside the education field) are needed in order to bridge the racial divide between schools in the same district.
In 1964, public schools in Prince Edward County, Virginia, reopened after being closed for five years by officials attempting to prevent court-ordered racial desegregation.
The scheme, it seems, was implemented across the state even though many Louisiana public schools are operating under federal court rulings requiring racial desegregation.
Board of Education, many school districts engaged in a grand experiment of racial desegregation through compulsory busing.
bypass court-ordered racial desegregation in the 1950s and 1960s