colitis

(redirected from Radiation colitis)
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co·li·tis

 (kə-lī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the colon. Also called colonitis.

colitis

(kɒˈlaɪtɪs; kə-) or

colonitis

n
(Pathology) inflammation of the colon
colitic adj

co•li•tis

(kəˈlaɪ tɪs, koʊ-)

n.
inflammation of the colon.
[1855–60]

colitis

Inflammation of the large intestine or colon. It may result from a viral or bacterial infection, causing pain and severe diarrhea.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colitis - inflammation of the colon
Crohn's disease, regional enteritis, regional ileitis - a serious chronic and progressive inflammation of the ileum producing frequent bouts of diarrhea with abdominal pain and nausea and fever and weight loss
irritable bowel syndrome, mucous colitis, spastic colon - recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea (often alternating with periods of constipation); often associated with emotional stress
ulcerative colitis - a serious chronic inflammatory disease of the large intestine and rectum characterized by recurrent episodes of abdominal pain and fever and chills and profuse diarrhea
inflammation, redness, rubor - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
Translations
kolitida
paksunsuolen tulehdus

colitis

[kɒˈlaɪtɪs] Ncolitis f

colitis

[kɒʊˈlaɪtɪs kəˈlaɪtɪs] ncolite f

colitis

[kɒˈlaɪtɪs] n (Med) → colite f

co·li·tis

n. colitis, infl. del colon;
chronic ______ crónica;
pseudomembranous ______ mucomembranosa;
spasmodic ______ espasmódica;
ulcerative ______ ulcerativa.

colitis

n colitis f; ischemic — colitis isquémica; microscopic — colitis microscópica; pseudomembranous — colitis seudomembranosa; ulcerative — colitis ulcerosa
References in periodicals archive ?
Others: Tolosa Hunt syndrome, vasculitis, Churg Strauss syndrome) and Acute radiation colitis.
Radiation colitis also shows hyalinization of the lamina propria, usually with telangiectatic blood vessels and atypical endothelial cells and fibroblasts.
In adults, the most common etiologies were secretory diarrhea (idiopathic, laxative abuse, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and fecal incontinence), malabsorption (pancreatic disease, noninflammatory short bowel syndrome, postgastrectomy, hyperthyroidism, and cholestasis), microscopic colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac sprue, and radiation colitis.