Rahv

Rahv

(rɑv)
n.
Philip, 1908–73, U.S. literary critic, born in Russia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Partisan Review was founded in 1934 as an outlet for New York's John Reed Club, a writers' organization set up by the Communist Party, but funding problems, changes in the party line, and the growing independence of its leading editors, William Phillips and Philip Rahv, made it impossible to continue.
Eliot or the politically conservative Wallace Stevens, according to Goffman, could be appropriated by editors such as Philip Rahv to define a new identity for urban Jewish intellectuals as they repudiated Stalinism in favor of a liberal individualism that privileged a fragmentary art.
Rahv suggests that "its quality of emotion [is] genuine but so elemental in its totality as to exact nothing from us beyond instant assent" (360).
Her claim, as Philip Rahv put it, is for "the right of the personality to that self-knowledge and self-development which only the process of experience can provide," (34) and which works to challenge orthodoxies of thought and behavior.
The cultism of myth," Rahv added, betrays "the fear of history," and "is patently a revival of romantic longings and attitudes.
The key marker in the emergence of modernism as the dominant aesthetic practice and mode of literary analysis in the 1940s and 1950s was the reformulation of the literary journal Partisan Review by the critics Philip Rahv and William Phillips.
Cuando Philip Rahv le advirtio sobre una resena hostil de A Cold Spring que apareceria en el siguiente numero de Partisan Review, Elizabeth se crispo ansiosamente: "Me estoy endureciendo, pero por el momento me siento bastante mal sobre mi propio trabajo.
Through Dupee he was put in touch with Philip Rahv and William Phillips, who had recently removed the magazine Partisan Review out from under the Stalinist sway of the John Reed Club, and were looking for financial supporters to keep it alive.
Modern writers, Howe said, quoting Philip Rahv,"' .
The critic Philip Rahv classified American writers up to, say, 1950 as either Palefaces or Redskins.
But if this brainy woman, this "woman Stendhal," this wild Irish orphan with the abusive papist uncle and the secret Jewish grandmother, could go to bed with trolls like Philip Rahv and Edmund Wilson, surely there was hope for all of us.
Philip Rahv, for example, calls the book "dull reading" and explains that "what has happened is that [Faulkner's] pattern and imagery have been impaired and dispersed by an unsuccessful method of presentation" (p.