rancor

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ran·cor

 (răng′kər)
n.
Bitter, long-lasting resentment; deep-seated ill will: He was filled with rancor after losing his job.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin, rancid smell, from Latin rancēre, to stink, be rotten.]

ran′cor·ous adj.
ran′cor·ous·ly adv.
ran′cor·ous·ness n.

ran•cor

(ˈræŋ kər)

n.
bitter resentment or ill will; malice.
Also, esp. Brit.,ran′cour.
[1175–1225; Middle English rancour < Old French < Late Latin rancor rancidity]
ran′cored;esp. Brit., ran′coured, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rancor - a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-willrancor - a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-will
ill will, enmity, hostility - the feeling of a hostile person; "he could no longer contain his hostility"
heartburning - intense resentment; "his promotion caused much heartburning among his rivals"
huffishness, sulkiness - a feeling of sulky resentment
grievance, grudge, score - a resentment strong enough to justify retaliation; "holding a grudge"; "settling a score"
enviousness, envy - a feeling of grudging admiration and desire to have something that is possessed by another

rancor

noun
Translations

rancor

n. rencor, resentimiento.
References in classic literature ?
You know best what satisfaction you would have, beyond that of gratifying a ridiculous rancor worthy only of wandering savages.
I hid my rancor as well as I could, and took what revenge lay in my power by insinuating that he might have a very different view if he read Heine in the original.
Some of the very peasants who had been most active in wrangling with him over the hay, some whom he had treated with contumely, and who had tried to cheat him, those very peasants had greeted him goodhumoredly, and evidently had not, were incapable of having any feeling of rancor against him, any regret, any recollection even of having tried to deceive him.
And the consciousness that the insult was not yet avenged, that his rancor was still unspent, weighed on his heart and poisoned the artificial tranquillity which he managed to obtain in Turkey by means of restless, plodding, and rather vainglorious and ambitious activity.
The whole affair sank to the deeper deeps of rancor and savageness.