rastrum


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rastrum

(ˈræstrəm)
n
a pen for drawing the five lines of a musical stave simultaneously
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RHIZORIDAE Volvulella cylindrica SCAPHANDRIDAE Scaphander cylindrellus TROCHIDAE Solariella nuda Solariella peramabilis Agathistoma corteziana Agathistoma eiseni TURBINIDAE Panocochlea rubidum Pomaulax gibberosus TURRITELLIDAE Turritella nodulosa VERMETIDAE Serpulorbis squamigerusus MOLLUSCA, BIVALVIA ARCIDAE Anadara grandis CARDIIDAE Cardium rastrum Cardium sp.
Fallows uses the presence of the frame-rule and the consistently parallel and equidistant staves to suggest that a rastrum was not used; in its place, the scribe may have used a fixed frame with five parallel bars.
preceding the duet 'Sweet peace') is found an insertion of fourteen leaves on different paper ruled with a different rastrum and in the hand of S5 containing the chorus 'Happy nation' (not printed in the original libretto), at the end of which is written 'Finis'.
His highly expert codicological analysis of the volumes falls down on only one point, albeit minor: the staff lines in both manuscripts show every sign (even in the facsimile) of having been printed rather than ruled, with or without the aid of a rastrum, Apart from the fact that this facsimile completes the publication of the extant works of the mysterious lutenist `Mr du Fresneua', who, frankly, seems competent rather than a composer of importance (the rest appears in the Goess Ms.
Best devotes forty pages to this subject in the Critical Report, offering a complete survey of twenty different types of paper, watermarks, and rastrum styles.
The watermarks and rastrum rulings of the paper suggest that the score originated c.
If UBC's autograph was indeed given to someone in Paris on 27 November after a performance by himself and his son chez Polignac, I doubt that Stravinsky (or anyone else) sat down in her salon, cut out his photograph from a newspaper interview, glued it to a piece of his own notepaper, ruled staff lines with his rastrum, wrote the fugue theme, and then dated it.
4 does not illustrate this particularly well, but a careful examination of the first three staves shows that a rastrum was indeed used in this source.
There are eight staves per page ruled with a four-staff rastrum with a span of 79.
Almost invariably the staves are ruled with a rastrum which draws, in ordinary manuscripts, between three and six staves at a time, although special rulings, with six-line staves for keyboard or tablature and combinations of six- and five-line staves for songs accompanied by the lute, were also available.