Raynaud's disease


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Ray·naud's disease

 (rā-nōz′)
n.
A circulatory disorder caused by insufficient blood supply to the hands and feet and resulting in cyanosis, numbness, pain, and, in extreme cases, gangrene.

[After Maurice Raynaud, (1834-1881), French physician.]

Raynaud's disease

(ˈreɪnəʊz)
n
(Pathology) a disease, mainly affecting women, in which spasms in the blood vessels of the fingers or toes restrict blood flow to the affected part, which becomes pale, numb, and sometimes painful. Often shortened to: Raynaud's
[named after Maurice Raynaud (1834–81), French physician who first described it]

Ray•naud's′ disease`

(reɪˈnoʊz)
n.
a vascular disorder characterized by blanching and numbness of the fingers or toes upon exposure to cold or stress.
[1880–85; after Maurice Raynaud (1834–81), French physician, who described it]
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References in periodicals archive ?
This affects blood pressure and responses to inflammation, including edema(swelling), and chronic pain associated with numerous medical afflictions such as CRPS, Lyme Disease, Fibromyalgia, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Raynaud's Disease and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.
None of the women had a history of Raynaud's disease.
Two-year-old Gracie Hughes is T under the spell of Raynaud's disease, and turns blue when she is exposed to the cold.
In rheumatology, the toxin can help treat painful blood vessel conditions like Raynaud's disease and scleroderma.
He introduces the fundamentals of biofeedback and its primary modalities (galvanic skin response, temperature, heart rate and variability, hemoencephalography, electromyography, and EEG) and the use of music therapy interventions for achieving self-regulation of physiological response, through techniques such as guided imagery to music, toning, meditation, and improvisation, and how physiological data combined with these techniques can be applied to treating stress, ADHD, addictions, chronic pain, Raynaud's disease, neuromuscular deficiencies, depression, autism, phobias, anxiety, and high blood pressure.
This latter application is borne out by the recommendation to use ginger for Raynaud's disease, which involves poor circulation to the hands and feet and causes excruciating pain when circulation is restored.
Blue fingertips: Fingertips that are blue-tinged or feel numb can be a sign of a circulatory disorder known as Raynaud's disease.
The condition is termed Raynaud's disease when the cause is unknown and Raynaud's phenomenon when it has an associated disorder (1).
CASEBOOK: RAYNAUD'S DISEASE This disorder occurs when the circulation in the fingers and toes decreases, suddenly leaving them white or blue and feeling cold.
Louise Watson, 30, was born with the hereditary condition Raynaud's Disease, which affects the circulation and says: "A friend actually bought me one treatment for Christmas last year as I had been complaining about my circulation quite a lot.
QDEAR Doctor, I have been struggling with cold hands for most of my life and just believed it was how I was, but I have been told I might have Raynaud's disease.
Ralph Sands wrote a letter concerning his daughter who has Raynaud's disease.