real presence

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Related to Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist: transubstantiation

real presence

n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the doctrine that the body of Christ is actually present in the Eucharist
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Noun1.real presence - (Christianity) the Christian doctrine that the body of Christ is actually present in the Eucharist
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior
church doctrine, religious doctrine, creed, gospel - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group
References in periodicals archive ?
Medieval debates about the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist emerged as early as the ninth century; in the eleventh century Berengar of Tours had raised the question of how the accidents of bread/wine remain after the consecration; and the term 'transubstantiation' was already in use by the mid-twelfth century.
Much of what we think of as Anglicanism was produced by Elizabeth I's decisive if arbitrary edict against further religious innovation, which froze the English Reformation more or less where it was when her brother Edward VI died (with the crucial exception that she insisted on priestly language during communion that validated the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist, a key Catholic concession).
Protestants do not have as their doctrine the belief of the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist.
perhaps the strongest and most characteristic tradition of Anglicanism is to affirm such a real presence of Christ in the Eucharist as enables the faithful communicant both to receive His life as a spiritual gift and to acknowledge Him as the giver, while at the same time the affirmation is combined with a determination to avoid as far as possible all precise, scholastic definitions as to the manner of the giving.