realist

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re·al·ist

 (rē′ə-lĭst)
n.
1. One who is inclined to literal truth and pragmatism.
2. A practitioner of artistic or philosophic realism.

realist

(ˈrɪəlɪst)
n
1. a person who is aware of and accepts the physical universe, events, etc, as they are; pragmatist
2. (Art Terms) an artist or writer who seeks to represent the familiar or typical in real life rather than an idealized, formalized, or romantic interpretation
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an artist or writer who seeks to represent the familiar or typical in real life rather than an idealized, formalized, or romantic interpretation
4. (Philosophy) philosophy a person who accepts realism
5. (Logic) (modifier) of, relating to, or characteristic of realism or realists in the arts, philosophy, etc: a realist school.
6. (Philosophy) (modifier) of, relating to, or characteristic of realism or realists in the arts, philosophy, etc: a realist school.
7. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (modifier) of, relating to, or characteristic of realism or realists in the arts, philosophy, etc: a realist school.
8. (Art Terms) (modifier) of, relating to, or characteristic of realism or realists in the arts, philosophy, etc: a realist school.

re•al•ist

(ˈri ə lɪst)

n.
1. a person who tends to view or represent things as they really are.
2. a writer or artist whose work is characterized by realism.
3. an adherent of philosophic realism.
[1595–1605]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.realist - a philosopher who believes that universals are real and exist independently of anyone thinking of them
philosopher - a specialist in philosophy
pragmatist - an adherent of philosophical pragmatism
2.realist - a person who accepts the world as it literally is and deals with it accordingly
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
pragmatist - a person who takes a practical approach to problems and is concerned primarily with the success or failure of her actions
3.realist - a painter who represents the world realistically and not in an idealized or romantic style
painter - an artist who paints
Translations
إنْسان واقِعي
realista
realist
realist
gyakorlatias ember
raunsæismaîur
realista

realist

[ˈrɪəlɪst] Nrealista mf

realist

[ˈrɪəlɪst] nréaliste mf

realist

nRealist(in) m(f)

realist

[ˈrɪəlɪst] nrealista m/f

real

(riəl) adjective
1. which actually exists. There's a real monster in that cave.
2. not imitation; genuine. real leather; Is that diamond real?
3. actual. He may own the factory, but it's his manager who is the real boss.
4. great. a real surprise/problem.
adverb
(especially American) very; really. a real nice house.
ˈrealist noun
a person who sees, or claims to see, life as it is, without being affected by emotion etc.
ˈrealism noun
ˌreaˈlistic adjective
(negative unrealistic).
1. showing things as they really are. a realistic painting.
2. taking a sensible, practical view of life. I'd like to think we'd sell five of these a day, but it would be more realistic to say two.
ˌreaˈlistically adverb
reality (riˈӕləti) noun
1. that which is real and not imaginary. It was a relief to get back to reality after hearing the ghost story.
2. the state of being real.
3. (often in plural reˈalities) a fact. Death and sorrow are two of the grim realities of human existence.
ˈreally adverb
1. in fact. He looks a fool but he is really very clever.
2. very. That's a really nice hat!
interjection
an expression of surprise, protest, doubt etc. `I'm going to be the next manager.' `Oh really?'; Really! You mustn't be so rude!
real estate
(the buying and selling of) land and houses.
for real
(especially American) genuine; true. He says he's got a new bike, but I don't know if that's for real.
in reality
really; actually. He pretends to be busy, but in reality he has very little to do.
References in classic literature ?
Of course, it is the contention of all us realists that all etherealists are but figments of the imagination.
But I thought you were a realist," exclaimed Carthoris.
The Realists, who were undoubtedly the masters of fiction in their passing generation, and who prevailed not only in France, but in Russia, in Scandinavia, in Spain, in Portugal, were overborne in all Anglo-Saxon countries by the innumerable hosts of Romanticism, who to this day possess the land; though still, whenever a young novelist does work instantly recognizable for its truth and beauty among us, he is seen and felt to have wrought in the spirit of Realism.
Of the succeeding realists the most important is Tobias Smollett, a Scottish ex-physician of violent and brutal nature, who began to produce his picaresque stories of adventure during the lifetime of Fielding.
He is a broad realist, giving to his romantic actions a very prominent background of actual contemporary life.
The view that seems to me to reconcile the materialistic tendency of psychology with the anti-materialistic tendency of physics is the view of William James and the American new realists, according to which the "stuff" of the world is neither mental nor material, but a "neutral stuff," out of which both are constructed.
The Muirhead Library of Philosophy was designed as a contribution to the History of Modern Philosophy under the heads: first of Different Schools of Thought--Sensationalist, Realist, Idealist, Intuitivist; secondly of different Subjects--Psychology, Ethics, Aesthetics, Political Philosophy, Theology.
Aristotle's failure does not lie in this, that he is both idealist and realist, but that he keeps these two tendencies too far apart.
Or if perchance a searching realist comes to our gate, before whose eye we have no care to stand, then again we run to our curtain, and hide ourselves as Adam at the voice of the Lord God in the garden.
This last argument, however, by no means commended itself to the pupil of Ockham, who plucked a great stick from the ground and signified his dissent by smiting the realist over the pate with it.
That which the droning world, chained to appearances, will not allow the realist to say in his own words, it will suffer him to say in proverbs without contradiction.
Thus, in chapter one, Edwards omits the view that many realists do not believe in universals simply because they are explanatorily successful posits; they believe in them also because they are directly aware of them.