Rebaptism


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Re`bap´tism

    (rē`băp´tĭz'm)
n.1.A second baptism.
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She has demonstrated that many bishops boycotted Cyprian's great council of 256 because they disagreed with him about rebaptism.
While the traditional theological emphasis remains on the importance of obedience to Christ, the covenant with the community of faith and the ordination of the individual into the priesthood of all believers, especially the requirement of rebaptism and of a specific mode of baptism, have changed.
One instance offering us a clear understanding is Vincent's discussion of the third-century controversy attending the proposed rebaptism of those who had apostatized from the faith during the persecutions undertaken by the Roman Empire.
Certain congregations permit the rebaptism of previously immersed Baptist church members who question the validity of their earlier professions of faith.
It is because of this desire for rebaptism of unity as important that tribalism is now in trouble.
20) In late 1533 Jan Mathysz reinstated the rebaptism of believers, and in 1534 the Hof ordered the beheading of several Anabaptists who followed him.
He denounced the actions of Cyprian and the North Africans as contrary to the apostolic traditions of the Church and demanded that the rebaptism of schismatics and heretics cease immediately.
If the corollary generic matter for Sorrentino to appropriate would be the sports column, the hagiographic baseball biography, the radio broadcast, and the television bio-documentary, his work pointedly rejects the suggestion that these popular culture founts, full of plebian sweat and tears, might lead to a new heteroglossic rebaptism of literary discourse.
37 ends the letter, oddly, with a seemingly unprompted question on rebaptism.
See also "Concerning Rebaptism," LW 40, 252: ""For even if I were never certain any more of faith, I still am certain of the command of God, that God has bidden to baptize, for this he has made known throughout the world.
of Northern Iowa) agrees, but points out that he opposed infant baptist for different reasons than his rebaptism contemporaries did.
On one side were those, including Cornelius, who favored a pastorally compassionate approach: Rebaptism should not be required.