Rebecca


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Related to Rebecca: Daphne du Maurier

Re·bec·ca

also Re·bek·ah  (rĭ-bĕk′ə)
In the Bible, the wife of Isaac and the mother of Jacob and Esau.

Rebecca

(rɪˈbɛkə)
n
(Bible) Old Testament the sister of Laban, who became the wife of Isaac and the mother of Esau and Jacob (Genesis 24–27). Douay spelling: Rebekah
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Rebecca - (Old Testament) wife of Isaac and mother of Jacob and EsauRebecca - (Old Testament) wife of Isaac and mother of Jacob and Esau
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Translations
Rebecca
Rebekka
Rebekka
Rébecca
Rebekka
Rebecka

Rebecca

[rɪˈbekə] NRebeca
References in classic literature ?
cried Miss Sedley; for this was the greatest blasphemy Rebecca had as yet uttered; and in those days, in England, to say, "Long live Bonaparte
Revenge may be wicked, but it's natural," answered Miss Rebecca.
which took place as the coach rolled along lazily by the river side) that though Miss Rebecca Sharp has twice had occasion to thank Heaven, it has been, in the first place, for ridding her of some person whom she hated, and secondly, for enabling her to bring her enemies to some sort of perplexity or confusion; neither of which are very amiable motives for religious gratitude, or such as would be put forward by persons of a kind and placable disposition.
Rebecca was seventeen when she came to Chiswick, and was bound over as an articled pupil; her duties being to talk French, as we have seen; and her privileges to live cost free, and, with a few guineas a year, to gather scraps of knowledge from the professors who attended the school.
It was in this happy-go-lucky household that Rebecca had grown up.
Lorenzo de Medici was flabby and boneless; Rebecca was a thing of fire and spirit: he lacked energy and courage; Rebecca was plucky at two and dauntless at five.
Her forces of one sort and another had seemingly been set in motion when she was born; they needed no daily spur, but moved of their own accord--towards what no one knew, least of all Rebecca herself.
Rebecca was capable of certain set tasks, such as keeping the small children from killing themselves and one another, feeding the poultry, picking up chips, hulling strawberries, wiping dishes; but she was thought irresponsible, and Aurelia, needing somebody to lean on (having never enjoyed that luxury with the gifted Lorenzo), leaned on Hannah.
While the scenes we have described were passing in other parts of the castle, the Jewess Rebecca awaited her fate in a distant and sequestered turret.
Answer it to our lord, then, old housefiend,'' said the man, and retired; leaving Rebecca in company with the old woman, upon whose presence she had been thus unwillingly forced.
For the sake of mercy,'' said Rebecca, ``tell me what I am to expect as the conclusion of the violence which hath dragged me hither
She locked the door behind her, and Rebecca might hear her curse every step for its steepness, as slowly and with difficulty she descended the turret-stair.