rebellion

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re·bel·lion

 (rĭ-bĕl′yən)
n.
1.
a. Open, armed, and organized resistance to a constituted government.
b. An instance of this.
2.
a. Defiance toward an authority or established convention: an act of adolescent rebellion.
b. An instance of this.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin rebelliō, rebelliōn-, from rebellāre, to rebel; see rebel.]

rebellion

(rɪˈbɛljən)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) organized resistance or opposition to a government or other authority
2. dissent from an accepted moral code or convention of behaviour, dress, etc
[C14: via Old French from Latin rebelliō revolt (of those conquered); see rebel]

re•bel•lion

(rɪˈbɛl yən)

n.
1. open, organized, and armed resistance to a government or ruler.
2. resistance to or defiance of any authority, control, or tradition.
[1300–50; Middle English rebellioun < Old French < Latin rebelliō=rebell(āre) to rebel + -iō -ion]

rebellion

, revolution - Rebellion is open resistance to a government or authority; revolution is a rebellion that succeeds in overthrowing the government and establishing a new one.
See also related terms for revolution.

Rebellion

 

fly in the face of To recklessly defy or challenge; to act in bold opposition to. A bird or insect that flies in the face of a predator is acting against its instincts and thus courting trouble. The phrase is often used figuratively to describe political or social opposition:

He had to fly in the face of adverse decisions. (Nations, December, 1891)

Extensions of the expression include to fly in the face of danger and to fly in the face of providence, both of which carry a sense of reckless or impetuous disregard for safety.

kick against the pricks To protest in vain, to ineffectually resist a superior force or authority, especially to one’s own detriment. This expression appears several times in the Bible. In Acts 9:5 Jesus answers Saul’s question “Who art thou, Lord?” by answering:

I am Jesus whom thou persecutest: it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks.

Prick in this case literally refers to a sharp, pointed goad for oxen and figuratively to the voice of authority. To literally kick against the pricks then is a painful and thoroughly futile act.

For the past ten years he has known what it is to “kick against the pricks” of legitimate Church authority. (Marie Corelli, God’s Good Man, 1904)

kick over the traces To rebel, to resist or rise up against the accepted order, to throw off or defy conventional restraints. A harnessed horse literally kicks over the traces when it gets a leg outside the straps (traces) connecting its harness to a carriage or wagon.

The effervescence of genius which drives men to kick over the traces of respectability. (Sir Leslie Stephen, Hours in a Library, 1876)

left-wing Espousing radical or progressive political, social, or economic ideologies; favoring extensive political, social, or economic reform; socialistic; Communistic. This expression arose as the result of the French National Assembly of 1789 in which conservatives were seated in the right side, or wing, of the hall, moderates in the middle, and radical democrats and extremists in the left wing. This seating arrangement persists in several contemporary legislatures including the British Commonwealth Assemblies where politicians with radical or socialistic views usually sit to the left of the presiding officer. After World War II, and especially during the McCarthy era, left-wing usually implied that one was a Communist or a Communist sympathizer.

The left-wing challenge over Europe is expected to unseat at least one member of the Labour Party National Executive Committee. (Times, September 5, 1972)

People or groups of people with left-wing philosophies are frequently called left wing, left-wingers, or the Left. The radical political activists in the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s were often called the New Left in an attempt to dissociate them and their activities from intimations of Communist influence or complicity.

sow dragon’s teeth See PROVOCATION.

take the bit between one’s teeth To cast off external controls and take charge of one’s own life; to rebel against unfair restraints or impositions. The bit in this expression refers to the mouthpiece of a bridle, attached to the reins used to control a horse. When a horse takes the bit between his teeth, the pain in his mouth is relieved and he becomes more manageable. This expression, dating from the early 17th century, often implies willful defiance. A variant is take the bit in one’s teeth.

young Turk An insurgent; one who advocates reform in a staid, conservative organization; a rebel; a political radical or liberal. In 1891, a group of reformists established the Young Turks, a political party dedicated to realigning the priorities of the Turkish Empire and instituting European ideologies and customs in governmental procedures. After inciting a revolt in 1908 in which the Sultan was deposed, the Young Turks remained a viable political force until the end of World War I. By extension, young Turk has assumed figurative implications as evidenced in this quote from John Gunther (1901-70), cited in Webster’s Third:

The young Turks … [are] opposed to the ossified conservatism of the older, so-called statesmen.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rebellion - refusal to accept some authority or code or conventionrebellion - refusal to accept some authority or code or convention; "each generation must have its own rebellion"; "his body was in rebellion against fatigue"
resistance - group action in opposition to those in power
2.rebellion - organized opposition to authorityrebellion - organized opposition to authority; a conflict in which one faction tries to wrest control from another
conflict, struggle, battle - an open clash between two opposing groups (or individuals); "the harder the conflict the more glorious the triumph"--Thomas Paine; "police tried to control the battle between the pro- and anti-abortion mobs"
insurgence, insurgency - an organized rebellion aimed at overthrowing a constituted government through the use of subversion and armed conflict
intifada, intifadah - an uprising by Palestinian Arabs (in both the Gaza Strip and the West Bank) against Israel in the late 1980s and again in 2000; "the first intifada ended when Israel granted limited autonomy to the Palestine National Authority in 1993"
mutiny - open rebellion against constituted authority (especially by seamen or soldiers against their officers)

rebellion

noun
1. resistance, rising, revolution, revolt, uprising, mutiny, insurrection, insurgency, insurgence They soon put down the rebellion.
2. nonconformity, dissent, defiance, heresy, disobedience, schism, insubordination, apostasy He engaged in a small act of rebellion against his heritage.
Quotations
"Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God" [John Bradshaw]

rebellion

noun
Organized opposition intended to change or overthrow existing authority:
Translations
ثَوْرَه، تَمَرُّدعِصْيان
povstánívzpoura
oprøropstand
vastarinta
bunapobunaustanak
fellázadás
neita aî hlÿîauppreisn
むほん反乱反抗反発抗議
rebellio
upor
bunaustanak
uppror

rebellion

[rɪˈbeljən] Nrebelión f, sublevación f

rebellion

[rɪˈbɛljən] n
(against society, upbringing, one's parents)rébellion f, révolte f
(MILITARY) (= uprising) → rébellion f, révolte f
(POLITICS)rébellion f, révolte f

rebellion

nRebellion f, → Aufstand m; to rise (up) in rebellioneinen Aufstand machen, sich erheben

rebellion

[rɪˈbɛljən] nribellione f

rebel

(ˈrebl) noun
1. a person who opposes or fights against people in authority, eg a government. The rebels killed many soldiers; (also adjective) rebel troops.
2. a person who does not accept the rules of normal behaviour etc. My son is a bit of a rebel.
(rəˈbel) verb past tense, past participle reˈbelled
to fight (against people in authority). The people rebelled against the dictator; Teenagers often rebel against their parents' way of life.
rebellion (rəˈbeljən) noun
1. an open or armed fight against a government etc.
2. a refusal to obey orders or to accept rules etc.
rebellious (rəˈbeljəs) adjective
rebelling or likely to rebel. rebellious troops/children.
reˈbelliously adverb
reˈbelliousness noun

rebellion

n. rebelión.
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He was invited to a Burmese rebel camp in 1991 during the civil war to teach a storytelling workshop at a makeshift university.
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Summary: BOGOTA, Jun 06, SPA -- Colombian military planes struck a leftist rebel camp on Sunday, killing six guerrillas in a raid in the south of the Andean nation, its air force said, according to Reuters.
Colombian forces have bombed a rebel camp in the southern jungle province of Meta, killing at least 16 leftist guerrillas, the country's military command has said.
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On Thursday evening, in an effort to stop MLAs from crossing over to the rebel camp seeking his ouster, Yeddyurappa announced the appointment of 29 of them as chairpersons to lucrative government boards and corporations.
Found in the computer of an alleged second-ranking commander of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Farc), the hour-long video given to the Associated Press by a government official is one of a half a dozen electronic documents recovered at a rebel camp destroyed in a cross-border raid last year.