recency effect


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

recency effect

(ˈriːsənsɪ)
n
(Psychology) psychol the phenomenon that when people are asked to recall in any order the items on a list, those that come at the end of the list are more likely to be recalled than the others
References in periodicals archive ?
There was more than a suggestion that party affiliation combined with the recency effect may have played a significant role in the responses.
The results from the first resurgence phase showed recency effect for all rats, followed by the first response sequence as the next highest proportion for half of the rats, while two rats exhibited the greater proportion of the second response sequence and one rat showed equal proportion of the first and second response sequences.
Results indicate a possible recency effect in longitudinal justice perceptions.
Age-related decline in recall does not typically affect all serial curve positions and thus, it is often the case that the primacy effect disappears while the recency effect remains unchanged (e.
Next the recency effect will be employed in order to demonstrate how the novel's pornographic elements become fused with its horrific elements.
The tendency to remember an item in the first position within a sequence is the primacy effect, and the tendency to remember an item in last position is the recency effect (Biswas, Grewal, & Roggeveen, 2010; Gurhan-Canli, 2003; Murphy, Hofacker, & Mizerski, 2006).
The other factor is a recency effect of working memory (Espino, Santamaria & Garcia Madruga, 2000a).
The recency effect always comes into play in this sort of debate and I was one of the doubters who were never able to proclaim Frankel the best Flat horse ever, but I have never seen anything like Sprinter Sacre over two miles.
The Recency effect demonstrates that we also usually remember the information at the end of a learning experience.
In many decision-making contexts, the recency effect is prominent, meaning that the latest or most recently collected items of evidence have a disproportionately large influence on decision makers' judgments.
There is very little in the literature on the role of the order effect, recency effect or primacy effect on the performance of accounting students.
Finally, we discovered through randomized survey experiments that women who received contextual risk information were impervious to the recency effect.