Rechabite

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Rechabite

(ˈrɛkəˌbaɪt)
n
(Alternative Belief Systems) a total abstainer from alcoholic drink, esp a member of the Independent Order of Rechabites, a society devoted to abstention
[C14: via Medieval Latin from Hebrew Rēkābīm descendants of Rēkāb. See Jeremiah 35:6]

Rechabite

a member of the Independent Order of Rechabites, a secret society devoted to total abstention from intoxicating liquors, founded in England in 1835.
See also: Alcohol
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References in periodicals archive ?
Expressions of interest to lease Rechabites Hall and the Perth Hostel in Northbridge open today, marking the final stage of the State Government s $6 million revitalisation project for William Street.
Matthew, and the late antique History of the Rechabites, attributed to a holy man by the name of Zosimus.
Treasures she has unearthed in charity shops and at car boot sales include a hanky of the teetotal Rechabites Friendly Society and one commemorating the 1935 canonisation of Thomas More and John Fisher.
In 1902, the Workmen's Union had monthly meetings; the Rechabites and the Shepherds had temperance concerts; there were bazaars, flower shows, and weekly dances during the summer.
We invented friendly societies, hospital clubs, the Rechabites, the Co-op, credit unions, the miners' libraries, the Mechanics' Institutes and trade unions.
One of the pictures is labeled, "Independent Order of Rechabites high movable conference August 19 -25 1933" The other, has written on it: "1st Battalion the Manchester Regiment July 12, 1954, exercising their freedom of the city and marching through Manchester.
The rest of us are only a sweet sherry away from the rechabites.
Calling themselves Israelites, Hebrews, Canaanites, Essenes, Judaites, Rechabites, Falashas, or Abyssinians (Ethiopians), they were founded primarily by West Indian immigrants.
Immediately to the south of the Britannia Inn/Poplars, stood, since 1872, the timber hall of the Independent Order or Rechabites.
Which is why, in 1837, the longest-lasting temperance organisation of all took his name and called them selves Rechabites.
John's world was not innocent of fiction, even of religious fiction, such as Tobit and The History of the Rechabites.
So several societies - like the Band Of Hope, Rechabites and The Good Templars - sprang up, trying to persuade people to 'Take The Pledge' and abstain from alcohol.