recombinant DNA

(redirected from Recombinant dna molecules)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Recombinant dna molecules: recombinant DNA technology

recombinant DNA

n. Abbr. rDNA
Genetically engineered DNA prepared by transplanting or splicing genes from one species into the cells of a host organism of a different species. Such DNA becomes part of the host's genetic makeup and is replicated.

recombinant DNA

n
(Genetics) genetics DNA molecules that are extracted from different sources and chemically joined together; for example DNA comprising an animal gene may be recombined with DNA from a bacterium

recombinant DNA


n.
DNA in which one or more segments or genes have been inserted, either naturally or by laboratory manipulation, from a different molecule or from another part of the same molecule, resulting in a new genetic combination.
[1970–75]

re·com·bi·nant DNA

(rē-kŏm′bə-nənt)
A form of DNA produced by combining genetic material from two different sources by means of genetic engineering. Recombinant DNA can be used to change the genetic makeup of a cell, as in adding a gene to make a bacterial cell produce insulin.

recombinant DNA

a DNA molecule in which the genetic material has been artificially broken down so that genes from another organism can be intro-duced and the molecule then recombined, the result being alterations in the genetic characteristics of the original molecule.
See also: Heredity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recombinant DNA - genetically engineered DNA made by recombining fragments of DNA from different organisms
deoxyribonucleic acid, desoxyribonucleic acid, DNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer found in the nucleus of a cell and formed from nucleotides and shaped like a double helix; associated with the transmission of genetic information; "DNA is the king of molecules"
Translations
ADN recombiné
References in periodicals archive ?
Since 1975 when the Asilomar Conference convened over recombinant DNA technology and led to the creation of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (recently changed to Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant and Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules), advances in biotechnology and recombinant DNA (rDNA) have necessitated oversight and safety reviews of life sciences research with biological materials through Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) oversight in the United States (Berg, Baltimore et al.
Their work underpinned the genetic engineering revolution of the 1970s and 80s that led to whole genome sequencing, the creation of recombinant DNA molecules and the identification of genes for just about any trait.
In 1972, Paul Berg, a molecular biologist at Stanford University beginning in 1959, created the first recombinant DNA molecules and, thus, the field of genetic engineering.

Full browser ?