recusant

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rec·u·sant

 (rĕk′yə-zənt, rĭ-kyo͞o′-)
n.
1. One of the Roman Catholics in England who incurred legal and social penalties in the 1500s and afterward for refusing to attend services of the Church of England.
2. A dissenter; a nonconformist.

rec′u·san·cy n.
rec′u·sant adj.

recusant

(ˈrɛkjʊzənt)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in 16th to 18th century England) a Roman Catholic who did not attend the services of the Church of England, as was required by law
2. (Roman Catholic Church) (in 16th to 18th century England) a Roman Catholic who did not attend the services of the Church of England, as was required by law
3. any person who refuses to submit to authority
adj
4. (Historical Terms) (formerly, of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
5. (Roman Catholic Church) (formerly, of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
6. refusing to submit to authority
[C16: from Latin recūsāns refusing, from recūsāre from re- + causārī to dispute, from causa a cause]
ˈrecusance, ˈrecusancy n

rec•u•sant

(ˈrɛk yə zənt, rɪˈkyu zənt)
n.
1. (in 16th to 18th century England) a person, esp. a Roman Catholic, who refused to attend the services of the Church of England.
2. a person who refuses to submit, comply, etc.
adj.
3. of or characteristic of a recusant.
[1545–55; < Latin recūsant- (s. of recūsāns), present participle of recusāre to demur, object =re- re- + -cūsāre, v. derivative of causa cause]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.recusant - someone who refuses to conform to established standards of conduct
beatnik, beat - a member of the beat generation; a nonconformist in dress and behavior
bohemian - a nonconformist writer or artist who lives an unconventional life
dissenter, dissident, objector, protester, contestant - a person who dissents from some established policy
enfant terrible - a person whose unconventional behavior embarrasses others
heretic - a person who holds unorthodox opinions in any field (not merely religion)
maverick, rebel - someone who exhibits great independence in thought and action
Adj.1.recusant - (of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
unorthodox - breaking with convention or tradition; "an unorthodox lifestyle"
2.recusant - refusing to submit to authority; "the recusant electors...cooperated in electing a new Senate"- Mary W.Williams
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"
Translations

recusant

[ˈrekjʊzənt]
A. ADJrecusante
B. Nrecusante mf

recusant

adj (Rel Hist) → der/die sich weigert, dem anglikanischen Gottesdienst beizuwohnen; (fig liter)renitent
References in classic literature ?
Joshua Rann, who gave out his bass notes with unusual complacency and threw an extra ray of severity into the glances he sent over his spectacles at the recusant Will Maskery.
My cognizance of the pit had become known to the inquisitorial agents -- the pit whose horrors had been destined for so bold a recusant as myself -- the pit, typical of hell, and regarded by rumor as the Ultima Thule of all their punishments.
A separate exhibition gallery will explore how religious belief has led to rebellion, with a particular focus on Catholic recusants who refused to attend Anglican services.
On the one hand, that work has necessarily focused on Catholic beliefs and believers--including recusants, the Jesuit soldiers of the Counter-Reformation, and church-papists--as it has sought to make visible an important subculture obscured by decades (even centuries) of historical and literary oversight.
Many of these novels celebrated the Protestant martyrs under the reign of Mary Tudor, but these eventually evoked narratives of recusants who risked their lives to reject biblicism in favor of the sacramental historical Catholic church, previewing what was to become a "new Counter-Reformation" (143).
Thompson's ambivalence had become a denial of faith by recusants of the Marxist altar.
The date of the troupe's establishment is not known, but the Simpsons appear to have been theatrically active as early as 1595 when Robert and Christopher Simpson were identified as players in a list of recusants in the Province of York (Talbot 32-33).
It seems that the present manuscript remained in the hands of Lady Joan's family, Vaux of Harrowden, throughout the 16th century, and was hidden when that family became Recusants and supporters of the gunpowder plot.
For many years, I have seen the jockeying for power, competitions for the limelight and the recusants at the back of the class.
Here she argues that as the Protestant ethos came to dominate official state position, which dictated the suppression of images and ornaments, Catholic recusants came to cherish these items more ardently.
Paulet informed Walsingham that "there were many recusants and other suspected papists within 12 miles of Tutbury, whose wives are not unlikely to do bad offices.