reed warbler

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reed warbler

n
(Animals) any of various common Old World warblers of the genus Acrocephalus, esp A. scirpaceus, that inhabit marshy regions and have a brown plumage
Translations

reed warbler

nRohrsänger m
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common species in the traps were Blackcaps, Lesser Whitethroat, Garden Warblers, Nightingales, and Reed Warblers, all long distant-migrants with populations declining in most EU countries.
A Welsh Ornithological Society conference near Caersws on November 7 will hear from TV naturalist Iolo Williams, writer Lucy McRobert and naturalists working on seabirds, Reed Warblers and gulls in Wales.
Here, we study the nesting biology of Great Reed Warblers in five different types of reed habitat (mining pond, sand pit, large canal, small canal, and small lowland river) to estimate nesting density, quantify habitat use and evaluate preference for nesting habitats while also considering the nesting success achieved in the various types of reed beds available for nesting.
Also at the presentation was Wild About Tamworth officer Mel Westlake who said the nature reserve was a particularly rare habitat because of its extensive reedbed and the various species it attracts and said: "It is an excellent site very close to the centre of Tamworth which benefits birds such as snipes and reed warblers.
nymphs) collected on great reed warblers and in Ixodes spp.
We leave lots of cover because if fields are too tidy birds such as linnets, yellow hammers and reed warblers get taken out by predators, such as Peregrine, barn owls and ravens.
The reed beds now have a thriving population of reed warblers.
Washington, May 17 ( ANI ): To ensure paternity, male reed warblers aggressively try to chase off competitors and to keep potentially "double-dealing" females in line, a new study has found.
They offer fantastic photographic opportunities and the chance to see barn owls, marsh harriers, sedge and reed warblers as well as wheatears and wagtails over the reedbed.
The area is an important breeding ground for birds such as reed warblers, reed buntings and water rail.
More usual summer migrants include the first reed warblers of the year at RSPB Conwy, and good numbers of whimbrels around the coast.
Volunteers have helped to propagate 20,000 reed seedlings to create a new, twohectare reed bed which will take several years to mature and become a home to sedge warblers, reed warblers, reed buntings and water rail.