Regiomontanus


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Re·gi·o·mon·ta·nus

 (rē′jē-ō-mŏn-tā′nəs, -tä′-, -tăn-əs, rĕj′ē-)
See Johann Müller.

Regiomontanus

(ˌriːdʒɪəʊmɒnˈteɪnəs; -ˈtɑː-; -ˈtæn-)
n
(Biography) original name Johann Müller. 1436–76, German mathematician and astronomer, who furthered the development of trigonometry
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Noun1.Regiomontanus - German mathematician and astronomer (1436-1476)
References in periodicals archive ?
Regiomontanus in VI Octans, for example, was born Johannes Muller von Konigsberg ("Regent's Mount") in 1436.
Professor Ragep has added significant knowledge on the period, arguing that the theory for the inner planets presented by the German mathematician/astronomer and Catholic bishop Johannes MEaA-ller von KEaA[micro]nigsberg, today best known by the Latin epithet Regiomontanus, which allowed Copernicus to convert the planets to eccentric models, was first developed in the 15th century by Al Qushji.
1274 AD) in his Talirir al-majisti 'Exposition of the Almagest', (3) or Regiomontanus (d.
These included Regiomontanus, Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, and Galileo-all of whom were taught astrology and/or practiced its principles.
It soon developed into a more detailed title-page, one with a two-color decorative border, the Calendarium of Johannes Regiomontanus, appearing in 1476 (Venice), being a fifty-five year calendar (1475-1530) printed by Johannes Regiomontanus.
The German mathematician and astrologer Johann Regiomontanus (1436-1476) was the first person to treat trigonometry as a distinct mathematical discipline.
Not long, therefore, after the death of Regiomontanus, Copernicus began to meditate a new system, which should connect together the celestial appearances, in a more simple as well as a more accurate manner, than that of Ptolemy" (43).
One of the earliest works on trigonometry by a European mathematician is De Triangulis by the 15th century German mathematician Regiomontanus.
Among these, 1 note especially Sebastiano Gentile's exploration of Alberti, Regiomontanus, and the reception of Ptolemy's Geography in Bessarion's circle in Rome in the 1460s: it clarifies and revises our understanding of Quattrocento perspective and cartography in the context of the history of ideas.