remonstrant

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re·mon·strant

 (rĭ-mŏn′strənt)
adj.
Characterized by remonstrance: "Pericles is the least remonstrant of Shakespearean heroes, a stalwart sufferer who is not about to challenge the injustice of the gods" (David Richards).
n.
1. A person who remonstrates.
2. Remonstrant A member of a Christian sect originating among a group of Dutch Arminians who in 1610 formally stated the grounds of their dissent from strict Calvinism.

re·mon′strant·ly adv.

remonstrant

(rɪˈmɒnstrənt)
n
a person who remonstrates, esp one who signs a remonstrance
adj
rare remonstrating or protesting

Remonstrant

(rɪˈmɒnstrənt)
n
1. (Protestantism) a Dutch supporter of the Arminian Remonstrance of 1610
2. (Historical Terms) a Dutch supporter of the Arminian Remonstrance of 1610
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The pug-dog sat up, as a precautionary measure, as I passed; but, as I took no notice of the treasure he was guarding, he let me go by without even one remonstrant bark.
Continuing to chuckle when his laugh is over, as though remonstrant with himself on his drinking powers, he rolls to the door and unlocks it.
Why, there you're rather fast, Lawyer Lightwood,' he replied, in a remonstrant manner.
The Synopsis surveys academic theology in the Reformed church shortly after its codification at the international Synod of Dort (1618-19), occasioned by the clash with Remonstrants in the Dutch Republic.
The Remonstrants formed a liberal current within the Dutch Reformed Church that was rooted (by way of Jacob Arminius, Simon Episcopius, and Hugo Grotius) in the Christian humanism of Erasmus and Coornhert.
Milton defended the Smectymnuans in Animadversions upon the Remonstrants Defense Against Smectymnuus (1641) and An Apology Against a Pamphlet Call'd A Modest Confutation of the Animadversions upon the Remonstrant Against Smectymnuus (1642).
e] Arminian or Remonstrants Tenets, & have also from ye Chief of those Doctrines (Universal Redemption) been call'd General Baptists.
Locke, for example, wrote Letter while in self-imposed exile in Holland where his earlier ideas on toleration were influenced by the Dutch Remonstrants and Louis XIV's revocation of the Edict of Nantes.
A theological dialogue did not materialize, however, since the Remonstrants refused to accept being called before the synod to have their theological positions judged; they wanted to be seated as full fellow delegates.
Coomhert, the Mennonite Pieter Twisck, and the Remonstrants Simon Episcopius and Philip van Limborch.
He was not only concerned with the differences between Remonstrants and Contra-Remonstrant parties in the Netherlands, which, in his view, were of minor importance.