renegado


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

renegado

(ˌrɛnɪˈɡɑːdəʊ)
n, pl -dos
an archaic word for renegade
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Trap-robber, horse-thief, squaw-man, renegado - Hank Butters - I know him very well.
This was a Blackfoot renegado, named Kosato, a fiery hot-blooded youth who, with a beautiful girl of the same tribe, had taken refuge among the Nez Perces.
and merchants lost at sea in Massinger's The Renegado (1624), Heywood's The Captives (1624), The Fair Maid of the West Parts] and 2 (revived 1631), and Shirley's Hyde Park (1634) were not merely fantastic plot turns--they evoked authentic experience.
The Archbishop prescribed his newly-penned "Form of Penance and Reconciliation [for] a Renegado or Apostate from the Christian Religion to Turkism," and Jukes was received back into the church on October 21, 1638.
It's a little odd that more than half of a book on tragicomedy would be devoted to Shakespeare, with only one Fletcher play treated at any length, but Forman's rich discussions of Fletcher's The Island Princess and Philip Massinger's The Renegado nonetheless highlight the vitality of English tragicomedy beyond the Shakespearean romance.
One example is in Massinger's The Renegado (1624) where a female Muslim character says "I have heard that Christian ladies live with much more freedom than such as are born here.
Andres de Almansa y Mendoza's Coverage of Prince Charles's Spanish Trip"; Alexander Samson, "1623 and the Politics of Translation"; Jeremy Robbins, "The Spanish Literary Response to the Visit of Charles, Prince of Wales"; Karen Britland, "A Fairy-tale Marriage: Charles and Henrietta Maria's Romance"; Marie-Claude Canova-Green, "A French View of the Marriage: Abraham Remy's La Galatee ou les Adventures du Prince Astiages"; Claire Jowitt, "'I am Another Woman': The Spanish and French Matches in Massinger's The Renegado (1624) and The Unnatural Combat (1624-5)"; Trudi L.
We are told that the Tripolitan grand admiral Murad Reis--commander of the Meshuda, and later the chief defender of Tripoli's harbor--was actually the Scottish renegado Peter Lisle.
194; Nungezer, Dictionary, 148; William Lloyd discusses allusion to and imitation of the play in Massinger's The Renegado, in 'A First Performance and an Imaginary Performance: Lady Elizabeth's Men, Queen Henrietta's Men and The Renegado', a paper written for the annual conference of the Shakespeare Association of America, 2006; on the illustration, see J.
The experts in Dictionary Corner were stunned when he came up with such words as craniates, tzardoms, protamine, valorise and renegado.
1609) by Robert Daborne; and The Renegado (1624) by Philip Massinger--with modern spellings.