Resoun


Related to Resoun: resound

Re`soun´


n.1.Reason.
v. i. & t.1.To resound.
References in periodicals archive ?
12) 'Now iwysse,'quoh hat wyze, 'I wolde I hade here he leuest hing for hy luf hat I in londe welde, For ze haf deserued, for sohe, sellyly ofte More rewarde bi resoun hen I reche myzt; Bot to dele yow for drurye hat dawed bot neked, Hit is not your honour to haf at his tyme A gloue for a garysoun of Gawaynez giftez, (SGGK III, 72, 1801-7) 'Now on my word,' then said he, 'I wish I had here the loveliest thing for thy delight that in my land I possess; for worthily have you earned wondrously often more reward by rights than within my reach would now be, save to allot you as love-token thing of little value.
in resoun ay so depe / Ne preciously, but help thiself anon"
enformedest my maneris and the resoun of al my lif to the ensaumple of the ordre of hevene?
Women who 'lyuen in ryot daunsynge and lepynge in nyztis and slepe out of resoun on [thorn]e morewe and forzeten god and his drede' (fol.
Before proceeding to the next step of the game, the Green Knight stresses the importance of the rules by referring to them as a covenant: "And thou hatz redily rehersed, bi resoun ful trwe, / Clanly al the couenaunt that I the kynge asked" (392-93).
2078-82: "But with be lif I eskaped by grace: I For myn erys with wex & gommys clere / Were stoppid so, pat I ne my3t[e] here / Touche nor werble of her instrumentis, / Wher-by pe resoun of [a] man y-blent is.
The ziftes of grace, as wille, mynde, resoun & vnderstandyng, whiche arn be ziftes of be soule inward, with be ziftes of nature outward, as beaute, shappe, (15) strength, hondes, feet, mouthe, nose, eien & eres.
Thus y awakede, weot god, whan y wonede in Cornehull Kytte and y in a cote, yclothed as a lollare, And lytel ylet by, leueth me for sothe, Amonges lollares of Londone and lewede ermytes, For y made of tho men as resoun me tauhte.
By treating resoun as "that which is rea- sonable,"(29) "that which is just, fair, moral,"(30) or even "a believable story, an acceptable narrative,"(31) common lawyers in the early eighteenth century were employing techniques that twentieth-century jurisprudes often claim to have discovered anew.
Still more prominent in the whole passage are the liquid and sibilant continuants - the rs, ls, ss, schs, and zs - introduced by the alliteration of sorz and syt in line three, and resoun, ryght, and rave in line six, continued forcefully in the next two lines with "ever the gyltles schulde be schente" (sch- alliteration), and culminating in the refrain, "inoscente is saf and ryghte" (s- alliteration).
t resoun y preue: pe childe pat is here of be born Bope lim & lif it is forlorn Alle purth hi fals bileue (577-594).
The sothe is this, the cut fil to the Knyght,/ And telle he moste his tale, as was resoun,/ .