resultative


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resultative

(rɪˈzʌltətɪv)
n
(in grammar) a phrase which describes the state of a noun by completing the verb phrase
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most salient differences between them is that attach can never be used with the comitative preposition with but only with to, which shows that there exists an asymmetric relation between the two entities being attached (x a y), and that the reciprocal interpretation in attach is only possible if the logical structure for attach is subsumed into the higher-level resultative construction, which would imply that the two entities are of comparable status and as a result a symmetric relation can be predicated between them (x << y).
On a more general note, the proposed epistemic distance account of the l-participle is not incoherent with the view that the existing perfect grams in modern Slavic languages developed from a resultative meaning, as proposed by Lindstedt (2000).
Thus, the present indicative shows progressive-processual, iterative-habitual, performative, and extended-now readings, as well as a completive-sequential reading, whereas the perfect indicative shows existential, resultative, present state, and extended-now readings.
resultative signals--mark inferential or causative relations between elements (as a result of, it was found that, these results suggest that)
For example, in English, the unaccusative status of 'break' accounts for its felicity in the resultative construction in (lb) and the causative alternation in (2).
The semantic determinants of argument expression: a view from the English resultative construction.
A proportion of action nouns are lexicalized into one-word factitive and/or resultative (further on to be referred to as factitive) nouns.
The former explores how the "metaphors we live by"--and more precisely LIFE IS A JOURNEY Can inform literary works, like Woolf's The Voyage Out; the latter studies how the conceptualization of a resultative construction ("being emailed to death") is governed by a cognitive scene that includes the PATH schema, with a departure point A, an arrival point B, a trajectory and a path connecting A with B.
Subtypes are the one's head off construction, the way construction, the time away construction, and the resultative construction, formalisations of which are given in (31):
Levin (1993) and Wright (2002) highlight only the (non)-participation of the verbs under consideration in the causative/inchoative alternation, thus neglecting constructions such as the intransitive resultative, the intransitive causal, the way-construction, the resultative construction, among many others.
At this level, the LCM explores the ways in which lexical predicates, which are lower-level configurations, are built into (higher-level) argument-structure constructions, such as the caused-motion, resultative, ditransitive, and dative constructions (Goldberg 1995: 2006).